Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 256
  • Last Modified:

Programming Help

I'm having trouble with c++ programming.  When would you prefer a switch over an if statement?
0
cooperk50
Asked:
cooperk50
  • 2
1 Solution
 
Infinity08Commented:
Basically : when you can use a switch, then do so :)

They're not really interchangeable. A switch is used when you have to check an expression for several values, like this :

        switch (expression) {
            case 1 : do_something_for_case_1(); break;
            case 5 : do_something_for_case_5(); break;
            default : do_something_default(); break;
        }

An if statement is used to check an expression to see whether it's true or false :

        if (expression) {
            do_something_true();
        }
        else {
            do_something_false();
        }
0
 
Infinity08Commented:
Check here for more info :

        http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/control.html

It's an interesting read.
0
 
Deepu AbrahamR & D Engineering ManagerCommented:
Use if-else statements in place of switch statements that have noncontiguous case expressions

If the case expressions are contiguous or nearly contiguous integer values, most compilers translate the switch statement as a jump table instead of a comparison chain. Jump tables generally improve performance because they reduce the number of branches to a single procedure call, and shrink the size of the control-flow code no matter how many cases there are. The amount of control-flow code that the processor must execute is also the same for all values of the switch expression.

However, if the case expressions are noncontiguous values, most compilers translate the switch statement as a comparison chain. Comparison chains are undesirable because they use dense sequences of conditional branches, which interfere with the processor's ability to successfully perform branch prediction. Also, the amount of control-flow code increases with the number of cases, and the amount of control-flow code that the processor must execute varies with the value of the switch expression.

For example, if the case expression are contiguous integers, a switch statement can provide good performance:

switch (grade)
{
   case 'A':
      ...
      break;
   case 'B':
      ...
      break;
   case 'C':
      ...
      break;
   case 'D':
      ...
      break;
   case 'F':
      ...
      break;

But if the case expression aren't contiguous, the compiler may likely translate the code into a comparison chain instead of a jump table, and that can be slow:

switch (a)
{
   case 8:
      // Sequence for a==8
      break;
   case 16:
      // Sequence for a==16
      break;
   ...
   default:
      // Default sequence
      break;
}

In cases like this, replace the switch with a series of if-else statements:

if (a==8) {
   // Sequence for a==8
}
else if (a==16) {
   // Sequence for a==16
}
...
else {
   // Default sequence
}

This explains it!

Well some we consider the readability as well!

Best Regards,
DeepuAbrahamK

0

Featured Post

Free Tool: ZipGrep

ZipGrep is a utility that can list and search zip (.war, .ear, .jar, etc) archives for text patterns, without the need to extract the archive's contents.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way to say thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now