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Login name that system is working out of has changed.  How do I change it back?

Posted on 2007-11-15
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Last Modified: 2010-04-13
Hello, when I started up my windows 2000 prof PC today I had noticed that my system was no longer working out of the folder [username]  (in my desktop and settings) but it was now working out of a new folder called [username.mycomputername].  All of my old data (including email account settings etc, is in the [username] folder in desktop and settings.  Does anyone know why Windows would have begun working out of a new folder and how can I get the computer back working the way it was before?  Thanks in advance for any help!
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Question by:jtmerch
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Pber
ID: 20288710
Make sure you account has full control of the original profile for NTFS security.
You should be able to point your profile back via the registry. go to:

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

This will have a list of all sids that have used the machine.  Go through all the sids looking at the "ProfileImagePath" value and look for the one that has username.mycomputername.  Once you find that, change that value to just username.

Next time you logon it should load your original profile.
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Expert Comment

by:sbtec
ID: 20288720
normally, this occures, when the profile has a bug, some files are corrupt or not readable and so far. Unless you have a actual backup, there is no way to fully restore your old profile. You can try to copy the old profiledata over the new one but in most cases, this will not work. Best way is to reboot, login as an administrator (NOT the User which has the Problem), rename both Userprofiles, then log on as the user again and let windows create a new profile. Now selectively copy the files from the old profile to the newly created one and (last) delete the 2 old Profiles... Greets from Switzerland, Stephan.
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Author Comment

by:jtmerch
ID: 20288879
Hi Pber, I don't see the username.computername anywhere when I get to the "profilelist" folder.  Anything else that you can think of?  Thanks for any help!
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Pber earned 2000 total points
ID: 20288922
There should be, that's how Windows finds your profile.

So in the registry in the following location:
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

There should be many keys that are SIDS,  If you click through each sid, it should bring up the values for that SID on the right.  In the right hand pane, there should be a value called "ProfileImagePath"  
That value data is normally: %SystemDrive%\Documents and Settings\someuserid
There should be one that is: %SystemDrive%\Documents and Settings\someuserid.yourdomainname

Normally you just need to remove the ".yourdomainname" and make sure security on the original folder is good and everything should be fixed.

If you don't have that, I don't understand how windows would find that profile.

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Author Comment

by:jtmerch
ID: 20289165
Awesome!! I did find the username.computername file under the image path in that folder and it worked to perfection!!! Thanks for the very fast resolution Pber!
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by:Pber
ID: 20289548
Glad to help.
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