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When I remote connect to our new server I see the desktop of another server.

Our network has several servers on it and I have been able to remote connect to each of them with no problem.  Recently we added a new Windows 2003 server and the first time i try to remote connect to it, the desktop is actually showing the desktop of one of the other servers.  It appears as if it somehow merged both servers together.  Can anyone tell me how to fix this?
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sprint263
Asked:
sprint263
1 Solution
 
Nathan PSystems ArchitectCommented:
How are you trying to connect to the "new" server?

Netbios name or IP?

Sounds like you have a problem in DNS to me, check your DNS/DHCP config, and make sure there aren't conflicted entries, or other problems.
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sprint263Author Commented:
I am trying to connect from Windows XP using Remote Desktop Connection and I simply type the name of the Server.  I get the correct Logon window for Windows Server 2003 R2.
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Nathan PSystems ArchitectCommented:
Is the old server also Windows Server 2003 R2?

Try just typing the IP address of the new server only using Remote Desktop Connection, and see if that rectifies your problem?
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arunexpCommented:
only desktop is same?? check the data in the server.. is that same as your other server. also try connecting from another client
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ChiefITCommented:
IP conflict: (most likely the problem)
I believe Remote Desktop uses IP. If you have a computer's desktop that isn't your server, then it sounds like you have an IP conflict. You should be able to see IP conflicts in Event viewer as an error. A client or other server may have your server's IP address. This may be caused by a Rogue DHCP server that dynamically assigned a client your static IP. Or, it may be a client that was unintentionally assigned your static IP. Or, it may be someone coming from home with a Dynamic IP assigned and brought it to work, (I have seen this before).

DNS conflict: (not likely the problem)
If using Netbios Name, then look in the computer's C:\i386\host file, (that you are trying to make a remote desktop connection with). You can look at that file by using a text editor, like word pad. There may be a with the wrong IP address of your server assigned to it. The computer will first look at the host before going to DNS to make that Netbios to IP translation. Once you looked at that host file and removed all entries but the local host, then check out DNS.

If you have a remote desktop connection to that computer, and you are using the domain administrators password, you probably can snoop through the machine and find out what machine it is by looking at documents and settings. Once you pinpoint out the rogue computer that has your server's info, things will be much easier to bring that client down and fix the conflict.

The third problem could be MAC spoofing: (This is a likely problem)
The latest design of computer hacks are taking the MAC address of other computers. This is called spoofing. If they have your MAC address of another computer, you are essentially that computer to the networking world. It's pretty ugly. There are ways to detect and eliminate spoofed MAC addresses.

Warning: When researching a spoofed MAC address, be careful where you end up. Usually you end up on a Hacker's web forum or website.
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