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Finding soft returns with find and replace

Posted on 2007-11-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
In Word 2003, when I use soft returns (Shift Enter) I sometimes want to find where they are in the doc without having to turn on the Show/Hide button, I want to be able to find them in the Find Replace dialog box, but I don't see any format code options that will allow me to do that.

Thanks,
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Question by:contrain
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dbfarrow earned 1000 total points
ID: 20292998
Well you could select the more button in the replace window/tab.  Then select the special button.  Next select Manual line break.

or you could type ^l  (that is a  lower case L)  
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by:Flyster
Flyster earned 1000 total points
ID: 20293071
From the Find dialog box, select More, then Special. Select "Manual Line Break"

Flyster
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Author Closing Comment

by:contrain
ID: 31409449
I got the correct answer twice. What a bonanza!!! Thanks all!!!!
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