• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 140
  • Last Modified:

Displaying Session variables with multiple levels of indirection

I am trying to provide macro-like substitutions for strings from an input file. The input file might have the string "The user is: !user!."

Suppose Session.user = "Steve"

I want to output the string with !user! replaced with the value of "Session.user".

If I use:
       <cfset line = REreplaceNoCase(#line#, '!(.*)!', '#Session.user#')>
       <cfset line = "#line#">

I get "The user is: Steve." That is, this works, but "!xxxxxx!" would be replace with the value of Session.user.

If I use:
       <cfset replaceString = "Session.\1">
       <cfset line = REreplaceNoCase(#line#, '!(.*)!', '#replaceString#')>
       <cfset line = "#line#">
                      <cfoutput>#line#</cfoutput>

I get "The user is: Session.user."

If I use:
       <cfset replaceString = "Session.\1">
       <cfset testReplace = "#replaceString#">
       <cfset line = REreplaceNoCase(#line#, '!(.*)!', '#testReplace#')>
       <cfset line = "#line#">
                      <cfoutput>#line#</cfoutput>

I get "The user is: Session.user."

If I use:
       <cfset replaceString = "Session.\1">
       <cfset testReplace = "###replaceString###">
       <cfset line = REreplaceNoCase(#line#, '!(.*)!', '#testReplace#')>
       <cfset line = "#line#">
                      <cfoutput>#line#</cfoutput>

I get "The user is: #Session.user#."

I need to have two evaluations. Thanks much for any help.
0
stevenschulman
Asked:
stevenschulman
  • 3
  • 2
1 Solution
 
_agx_Commented:
Perhaps I'm missing something but is there a reason a straight replace wouldn't work?


<cfset theNewLine = replace(line, '!user!', Session.user, "all")>

Open in new window

0
 
James RodgersWeb Applications DeveloperCommented:
>>I want to output the string with !user! replaced with the value of "Session.user".

If I use:
       <cfset line = REreplaceNoCase(#line#, '!(.*)!', '#Session.user#')>
       <cfset line = "#line#">

I get "The user is: Steve." That is, this works, but "!xxxxxx!" would be replace with the value of Session.user.

isn't that what you want? or am i not reading the first line right?
what output are you looking to achieve?
0
 
stevenschulmanAuthor Commented:
!user! is only an example. If the text were "Hello !firstName! !lastName!" then !firstName! would be substituted with the value of Session.firstName and !lastName! would be substituted with the value of Session.lastName.
0
The 14th Annual Expert Award Winners

The results are in! Meet the top members of our 2017 Expert Awards. Congratulations to all who qualified!

 
James RodgersWeb Applications DeveloperCommented:
then you should not use a regex but a specific replace
<cfset temp=#replace(line,"!somestring!", #session.somestring#,'all')>
reg ex is for pattern matching you need exact matching

the pattern you are using, !(.*)!',  will match !user!  and !xxxxxx! but it would also match
this sentence ending an an exclamation! and the next sentence ending in an exclamation!
would look like this
this sentence ending an an exclamationSteve
so use exact match replacement
0
 
stevenschulmanAuthor Commented:
I understand that, but with regular expressions whatever is enclosed in parenthesis is returned and reusable as \n. Thus, in this case, "!(.*)!" matches all characters between two exclamaition points and provides the specific values matched in "\1|. That is why I use "Session.\1". This does, in fact, work. I get the value "Session.user" or "Session.firstName" or "Session.lastName". The problem is that I have the string, but can not seem to go the next step to have it evaluated.

I tried using Evaluate() function. I suspect that the answer lies there somewhere, but I still can not get it to work.
0
 
James RodgersWeb Applications DeveloperCommented:
of then set the replace as #session.\1*

and tehn before pout[utting try this

#de(line)#
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now