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[noob][c++]  what is a container?

Posted on 2007-11-16
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what is a container?
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Question by:Troudeloup
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by:cuziyq
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A container is a set of data wrapped up in a class.  A linked list is an example of a container class.
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by:Axter
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A container is a class that stores multiple objects of the same type.
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Example containers:
std::vector
std::list
std::deque
std::map
std::set

Some would also consider std::string a container.
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by:itsmeandnobodyelse
itsmeandnobodyelse earned 150 total points
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To add to above information:

By using template containers you can store any arbitrary type. The most used container class is std::vector which is a dynamic array class. A special and very useful container is std::map whic is a so-called dictionary. A dictionary has a key and data type, which were stored as a pair. A dictionary provides a fast access to the data via the key.

Regards, Alex
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by:Axter
ID: 20300263
FYI:
Many developer make the mistake of using std::list as they're default container.
For most requirements std::vector is more efficient then std::list.
Moreover, the C++ standard recommends using std::vector as the default container.

In general, std::list should only be used when you need to remove or add content from the center of the container.

std::deque should be used if you need to add or remove content from the start (beginning) of the container, but don't need to add/remove content from the center.

std::vector should be the default container, since for most requirements, you only need to add/remove content from the end of the container.

Some experts recommend using std::vector, even when you need to add/content from the start or middle of the container when the add/remove action is not accessive.
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by:Troudeloup
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