Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

[noob][c++]  what is a container?

Posted on 2007-11-16
6
Medium Priority
?
199 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-01
what is a container?
0
Comment
Question by:Troudeloup
6 Comments
 
LVL 14

Assisted Solution

by:cuziyq
cuziyq earned 400 total points
ID: 20299637
A container is a set of data wrapped up in a class.  A linked list is an example of a container class.
0
 
LVL 30

Assisted Solution

by:Axter
Axter earned 1000 total points
ID: 20299657
A container is a class that stores multiple objects of the same type.
0
 
LVL 30

Accepted Solution

by:
Axter earned 1000 total points
ID: 20299666
Example containers:
std::vector
std::list
std::deque
std::map
std::set

Some would also consider std::string a container.
0
Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 39

Assisted Solution

by:itsmeandnobodyelse
itsmeandnobodyelse earned 600 total points
ID: 20299695
To add to above information:

By using template containers you can store any arbitrary type. The most used container class is std::vector which is a dynamic array class. A special and very useful container is std::map whic is a so-called dictionary. A dictionary has a key and data type, which were stored as a pair. A dictionary provides a fast access to the data via the key.

Regards, Alex
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 20300263
FYI:
Many developer make the mistake of using std::list as they're default container.
For most requirements std::vector is more efficient then std::list.
Moreover, the C++ standard recommends using std::vector as the default container.

In general, std::list should only be used when you need to remove or add content from the center of the container.

std::deque should be used if you need to add or remove content from the start (beginning) of the container, but don't need to add/remove content from the center.

std::vector should be the default container, since for most requirements, you only need to add/remove content from the end of the container.

Some experts recommend using std::vector, even when you need to add/content from the start or middle of the container when the add/remove action is not accessive.
0

Featured Post

VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Errors will happen. It is a fact of life for the programmer. How and when errors are detected have a great impact on quality and cost of a product. It is better to detect errors at compile time, when possible and practical. Errors that make their wa…
Written by John Humphreys C++ Threading and the POSIX Library This article will cover the basic information that you need to know in order to make use of the POSIX threading library available for C and C++ on UNIX and most Linux systems.   [s…
The goal of the video will be to teach the user the concept of local variables and scope. An example of a locally defined variable will be given as well as an explanation of what scope is in C++. The local variable and concept of scope will be relat…
The viewer will be introduced to the member functions push_back and pop_back of the vector class. The video will teach the difference between the two as well as how to use each one along with its functionality.

916 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question