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Join where LIKE?

Posted on 2007-11-16
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Last Modified: 2010-03-19
See tables below. The table PipeFull contains varchars up to 4,000 characters long that may or may not contain an acct number from table la_missing_nate.

The following SQL is running, but is this proper?

      select a.*, b.*
      from dbo.la_missing_nate a
      join dbo.PipeFull b
      on b.test like a.acct


CREATE TABLE [dbo].[PipeFull](
      [test] [varchar](max))

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[la_missing_nate](
      [acct] [nvarchar](50))
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Question by:donnatronious
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3 Comments
 
LVL 55

Expert Comment

by:Jaime Olivares
ID: 20302658
why the like word?

select a.*, b.*
      from dbo.la_missing_nate a
      join dbo.PipeFull b
      on b.test = a.acct
0
 
LVL 27

Accepted Solution

by:
MikeToole earned 250 total points
ID: 20303771
For a LIKE comparison you need to specify wildcard characters. A % stands for any number of characters.

      select a.*, b.*
      from dbo.la_missing_nate a
      join dbo.PipeFull b
      on b.test like '%' + a.acct +'%'
0
 
LVL 25

Assisted Solution

by:imitchie
imitchie earned 250 total points
ID: 20303849
like Mike said, if you had 'Account X1234 has been archived' in PipeFull and 'X1234' in la_missing_nate
b.test like a.acct   means it has to math 'X1234' exactly, whereas
'%' + a.acct + '%' turns it into '%X1234%' which means

it can have any number of characters either side of a.acct
HOWEVER, there's a catch. if any of your account codes contain '%', your search expression becomes funny. The attached code far below shows you the what happens.  This code is more robust by escaping the %'s in the search string:

      select a.*, b.*
      from dbo.la_missing_nate a
      join dbo.PipeFull b on b.test like '%' + replace(a.acct, '%', '\%') + '%' escape '\'
create table ab ( a varchar(max) )
insert into ab values ('test account X123 is closed')
insert into ab values ('test account X1 test 23 is closed')
create table ac ( a varchar(10) )
insert into ac values ('X123')
insert into ac values ('X1%23')
 
select * from ab join ac on ab.a like '%' + ac.a + '%' escape '\'
select * from ab join ac on ab.a like '%' + replace(ac.a, '%', '\%') + '%' escape '\'

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