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Using references as an array...

Posted on 2007-11-17
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Last Modified: 2010-04-01
Hi,

void myFunction(char &myArray, unsigned int arraySize){
     for(unsigned int i=0;i<arraySize;i++)
          cout<<myArray[i];
     cout<<endl;
}

Produces a "subscript requires array or pointer type"? I'd prefer to stick with references if possible, and I'm going to be passing in things like:

char *myArray=new char[20];
myFunction(myArray[10], 2);

so will I still be able to use references in this manner?

Thanks,
Uni
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Question by:Unimatrix_001
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4 Comments
 
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Infinity08 earned 500 total points
ID: 20304340
I'm confused at what you're trying to do :

        char *myArray=new char[20];

creates an array of 20 chars.

        myFunction(myArray[10], 2);

passes the 11-th character from that array.

        void myFunction(char &myArray, unsigned int arraySize){

accepts that 11-th character by reference.

        cout<<myArray[i];

but then you try to treat the character as an array ...
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 20304345
Did you mean this :


void myFunction(char *myArray, unsigned int arraySize){
     for (unsigned int i = 0; i < arraySize; i++)
          cout << myArray[i];
     cout << endl;
}
 
char *myArray = new char[20];
myFunction(&(myArray[10]), 2);

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Author Comment

by:Unimatrix_001
ID: 20304348
Actually... yep, that's it... I'm getting a little confused with how references are used... My bad.
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LVL 3

Author Comment

by:Unimatrix_001
ID: 20304350
Certainly did. ;)
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