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Dot1q trunking over a wireless bridge.

We are implementing a new switch architecture that adds VLAN technology. Each of our VLANs can operate seemlessly within the immediate building. We have one building (300 yds away from the main building) that can only physically connect back to the main building via wireless (buffalo air stations set to WDS bridging).

My question is, if I have a VLAN capable switch on one end behind the wireless and another on the other behind the wireless, can I send VLAN tagged frames through without it stripping the headers?

I figure that since 802.11 runs at layer two, it will do no harm to the frame headers and rebuild them properly on the other end of the connection, then whatever interface that the wireless is plugged into on the switches would be my trunk link.

Thoughts?

Thanks in advance.
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AmericanBridge
Asked:
AmericanBridge
1 Solution
 
svsCommented:
Why don't you ask the manufacturer?  They will know.
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
Even though the 802.11 is layer two, so is 802.1q. So in order to trunk wirelessly, the wireless device has to support it. You'll need to check the spec's of whatever wireless device you're using to see if it supports 802.1q.
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AmericanBridgeAuthor Commented:
I am going to test a trunk over wireless tomorrow. I'll post how it goes.

AB
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AmericanBridgeAuthor Commented:
Well I was able to trunk a wireless connection with the two buffalos. There is alot of hype over this config so below is the configuration...

One 3524 (Cisco) with a Buffalo connected to fa0/1
: VLAN configuration

VLANs 1, 2, and 3 with data on the Cisco switch

Fa0/1: VLAN 1 Trunk mode, encapsulation dot1q, native VLAN 1
Fa0/2: VLAN 2 access mode (Printer)
Fa0/3: VLAN 3 access mode (Client)

***Other end of wireless****
Cisco 2600XL with Buffalo Airstation on port fa0/1

Fa0/1: VLAN 1: " Same as 3524"
Fa0/2: VLAN 2: " Same as 3524"
Fa0/3: VLAN 3: " Same as 3524"
Gi0/23: VLAN 1: " Trunk, encapsulation dot1q"

NOTE: A core switch in the main building is performs the routing between vlans

Over the wireless, I can ping from a client to a printer on the other end, and vice versa.
So, the wireless will trunk under WDS mode. WDS mode is the bridging mode for the wireless links.
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pulkit1982Commented:
You will have to Configure SSID in  Native VLAN for the same.
The Switch interface connecting to the AP will be configured as Trunk port-
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
 switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
 switchport trunk native vlan 12
Switchport trunk allowed VLAN 4,12,74
 switchport mode trunk
 switchport nonegotiate
refering to the above Configuration the AP management IP will belong to VLAN 12 network and SSID will be configured for VLAN 12.

I hope this will work.
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AmericanBridgeAuthor Commented:
Yea,

I got it working ok.

The SSID didn't have to be added to the config since the two APs actaully act like a WDS bridge. They think they are connected via ethernet cable basically.

In the case of an Aironet with multiple wireless connections, your config would be mandatory.

***Message to site Admin, I am accepting a solution but please leave this question open. It is very useful info. Thanks.
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