Are there "Most Reliable" or "Best Practice" wireless adapter settings?

Assuming a PC with Windows XP Pro, are there wireless adapter settings that are considered to provide the most-reliable, consistent, connections? In other words, understanding that there might be compromises in other areas, how (if at all possible) can I configure 802.11x wireless adapters, drivers, and network connection settings on the client end to keep a connection to an AP once obtained?
nicholasjwolfAsked:
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and235100Connect With a Mentor Commented:
The most reliable connection is to use 802.1x authentication - and the best authentication mechanism is, to my mind, EAP Tunneled Transport Layer Security. This is only really viable in a business environment, as you require RADIUS. And you can choose to use this in conjunction with WEP, or not.
For the most reliable wireless - choose this method without WEP.
http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/1041171

For security - I would advise utilizing WPA2 Enterprise, though - but this isn't the most reliable type of connection - but it could be, depending on environmental factors, number of AP's etc.

"Best Practise" and "Most Reliable" are rarely the same.

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skinnyquiverCommented:
I find wep to keep a connection longer then wpa and no security to keep the connection longer then both. Get the latest driver for the card as well as the latest firmware for the AP. make shure windows is updated all the way
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skinnyquiverCommented:
also a range extender if signal is weak.
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nicholasjwolfAuthor Commented:
What about MTU size, Roaming Aggressiveness, and Data Rate settings at the driver level?
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and235100Connect With a Mentor Commented:
MTU size for windows networks should always be 1500.
Roaming Aggressiveness is a slightly more complicated matter. It really depends on how many AP's you have - and how far spread out they are.
Ideally - you want a good range of opposing wireless channels - and with a lot of AP's in one area - you can have aggresive roaming configured to a high aspect - as the AP's will all overlap nicely - meaning you have good coverage - and the extra number of AP's will be taken advantage of.
Generally - you don't want aggressive roaming when you have a large area with fewer AP's. You only really want the wireless devices picking up a new access point if necessary.
Data Rate - I take it that you are referring to 802.11A/B/G/N. 802.11G is probably your best bet, when used with 802.11A (makes the AP's more efficient - different bands - more coverage) - unless you wish to purchase draft 802.11n equipment for little gain in speed and range. Wireless is still wireless, after all.
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nicholasjwolfAuthor Commented:
and235100: Thanks for all of the good info! I'm curious though, why should the MTU size for windows networks always be 1500?
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and235100Commented:
Microsoft?
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314496
Look at "Ethernet"
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