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Hyperlinks show # (hash) symbol in reports

Posted on 2007-11-19
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Last Modified: 2013-11-28
I have a very simple database created in Access 2003, and since ported to 2007. In once table I have several columns containing hyperlinks. When I add those fields to a report, the hyperlinks show "#" hash symbols at the begining and end of each hyperlink on the report.

I have managed to stop the report underlining each hyperlink, which is great, but where are these # symbols coming from, and how do I remove them?

Many thanks in advance
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Question by:pstanyer
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by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 20313986
you can use the replace function
replace([Url],"#","")

or take a look at  HyperlinkPart function

SELECT URL, HyperlinkPart([URL],0)
    AS Display, HyperlinkPart([URL],1)
    AS Name, HyperlinkPart([URL],2)
    AS Addr, HyperlinkPart([URL],3)
    AS SubAddr, HyperlinkPart([URL],4)
    AS ScreenTip
    FROM Tablename
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Author Comment

by:pstanyer
ID: 20314012
I think... I have found the solution after more fiddling.

In the properties section of the field in the report, I select the option under Format Properties, Is Hyperlink - yes. The #'s disappear.

Thanks though!
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