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SQL Server Comparing Cyrillic Characters with Latin ones

Posted on 2007-11-19
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Last Modified: 2008-02-01
Hi,

I have a table (AlphabetTable) with the following columns:
RussianCharacter, GermanCharacter

I want to query like this:

select GermanCharacter from AlphabetTable where RussianCharacter = 'и'

My SQL Server has the following collation: Latin1_General_CI_AS

My query always returns no rows even though all the Russian characters are entered into the table. This is for a very basic function that translates a customer name entered in Cyrillic.

Assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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Question by:milesryoung
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Expert Comment

by:David Todd
ID: 20316726
Hi,

The collations of the two expressions being compared needs to be the same.

What are your collation settings?

The collate keyword can be used to cast the collation of a string in a comparision.

Neither the SQL 2000 or the SQL 2005 BOL had good examples - COLLATE (Transact-SQL) was the best imo.

HTH
  David
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Accepted Solution

by:
imitchie earned 1500 total points
ID: 20318607
what the the column types for GermanCharacter and RussianCharacter, nvarchar?
if it is, then use
select GermanCharacter from AlphabetTable where RussianCharacter = N'russiantext'

you can also try
select GermanCharacter from AlphabetTable where RussianCharacter = 'russiantext' collate database_default
(or the N'russiantext') version
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Author Comment

by:milesryoung
ID: 20318806
Hi, thanks for the help.

Both columns are type nvarchar(4) and your first solution works fine when I type in the query in query window with a russian character within single quotes. I.E. N'x'

That is a solution to my original question so I'll accept it as the solution but if I pass a character from a stored procedure to a function, how can I make use of that "N"? I.E. N'@myCharacter'



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LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:imitchie
ID: 20318942
as long as you pass them around as nvarchar, you should be fine. i.e.

declare @param nvarchar(10) set @param = N'somerussian'
exec myproc @param      <--- passing as nvarchar

create proc myproc ( @myvalue nvarchar(10)  ....   << receiving as nvarchar
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