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Posted on 2007-11-19
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The BYTE  value for 42 in binary is 00101010 - Can someone please explain this logic, as I could not understand clearly.
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Question by:JohnSrinivassan
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by:ozo
ID: 20316693
128 64 32 16   8    4   2  1
    0   0   1   0   1    0   1  0
            32 +     8   +   2  = 42
     
   
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by:b0lsc0tt
ID: 20316697
JohnSrinivassan,

It can be difficult to understand.  Simply put each number place represents a exponential value of 2.  In the case of a byte it would be 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128.  A value of zero is like a No and a value of 1 is like a Yes for the number.  Starting from the right this means you have 2 + 8 + 32 which equals 42.  Depending on the character type the binary values can have other meanings but this is how the binary you have results in 42.

Let me know if you have any questions or need more information.

b0lsc0tt
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by:ozo
ID: 20316753
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Arthur_Wood earned 250 total points
ID: 20319097
In binary:

128 64 32 16   8    4   2  1
    0   0   1   0   1    0   1  0
            32 +     8   +   2  = 42

Notice that each digit (bit), as read from right to left, represents a power of 2

In Decimal:

1000   100  10   1
   0        0      4   2  
                    40+2 = 42

each digit ('bit'), as read from right to left, represents a power of 10

AW
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by:JohnSrinivassan
ID: 20323052
128 64 32 16   8    4   2  1
    0   0   1   0   1    0   1  0

What will be the byte value for 50, 44 and 88?  Please explain.  
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by:b0lsc0tt
ID: 20323292
First please explain why you close the question as you did?  I could understand a split but the comment you accepted was not the first or even the second to post the explanation.  It would be nice to know what made you select it over the earlier posts.  (Nothing against AW's good comment)

Then if you do want other numbers explained please let us know what is not clear or understood about the explanation above.  The comments seemed to be general enough to explain this already.

bol
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by:ozo
ID: 20323361
50 = 32+16+2
44 = 32+8+4
88 = 64+16+8
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by:b0lsc0tt
ID: 20323647
I just noticed the grade was a B too.  Please explain that as well.  If you have questions about grading then let me know.  I'll be happy to help.  If you didn't mean to close this or still had a question about this then let us know.  The experts here can definitely contribute more and help you.  There is no reason you should have to leave without a complete answer worth an A.

bol
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Author Comment

by:JohnSrinivassan
ID: 20330372
b0lsc0tt,
The reason I have given the figures 50, 44 and 88 is to try to understand how the bytes represent them and try to understand 0 is no and 1 is yes from the explanation said before.

"Simply put each number place represents a exponential value of 2.  In the case of a byte it would be 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128.  A value of zero is like a No and a value of 1 is like a Yes for the number.  Starting from the right this means you have 2 + 8 + 32 which equals 42.  Depending on the character type the binary values can have other meanings but this is how the binary you have results in 42"

50 = 32+16+2  
44 = 32+8+4
88 = 64+16+8

The value of 16, 4 & 1 is 0, then how can you take these numbers into account while representing 50, 44 & 88?  This is still a bit of confusion.

What is the logic of 128 and 64 having the value of 0?  Please help me to understand.
Thanks.
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by:ozo
ID: 20331967
if you have 128 + <anything> the number would already be larger than 50 or 44 or 88
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by:b0lsc0tt
ID: 20332033
Thanks for the response and comment.  Sorry if the way I used Yes/No confused you a bit.  I'll be happy to clarify and help if you'll answer my questions first.  Why did you close the program the way you did accepting only the one comment and the grade you assigned?

bol
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by:Arthur_Wood
ID: 20332281
50 = 32+16+2    in Binary that would be

    32   16     8    4    2     1     successive powers of 2
     1     1      0     0   1     0   = 110010

44 = 32+8+4

     32   16     8    4    2     1
     1     0       1    1    0     0   = 101100

88 = 64+16+8

     64   32   16   8   4  2   1
       1     0     1   1   0  0   0  = 1011000

an 8 bit value can represent any number between 0 and 255

128   64   32   16    8     4     2      1
   0      0     0     0    0     0     0      0    = 0

   1      1     1     1    1     1     1      1    =  128+64+32+16+8+4+2+1 = 255


AW
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