Solved

How do I employ a "deployment descriptor" for a Java business class in both stand-alone and servlet context

Posted on 2007-11-19
1
191 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-24
I am attempting to build my first Java application, with an initial goal of making it a web app.  I have followed the MVC convention and placed all of the business logic in a separate class (the Model).  I am unclear how to create a configuration file for this Model class for things like datasource information.  In my research it has been very clear how configuration works for servlets (a deployment descriptor: web.xml).  What isn't clear is how I can utilize some similar configuration scheme for the Model class, such that it will work when deployed as part of a servlet app but also as a class included by a non-web Java app (such as the test harness I built for the Model class). It seems I could use web.xml for the model class when it is part of a servlet, but then how would it work in a standalone app? The ideal solution won't make me use two different methods for using the class in a servlet vs in a standalone app.
0
Comment
Question by:bluegreenone
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
1 Comment
 
LVL 27

Accepted Solution

by:
mrcoffee365 earned 500 total points
ID: 20318106
Most people put configuration information (for non-Web apps) into a properties file, sometimes named myapp.properties.  It's in the name=value format, so it can easily be read using the methods of the Properties class.  You can put myapp.properties in the same directory as your class files, or in your .jar file (often in the top directory, but location varies).

Then, in your web.xml file, you could put the location of the myapp.properties file, which is then used to read the properties for your model class.
0

Featured Post

Forrester Webinar: xMatters Delivers 261% ROI

Guest speaker Dean Davison, Forrester Principal Consultant, explains how a Fortune 500 communication company using xMatters found these results: Achieved a 261% ROI, Experienced $753,280 in net present value benefits over 3 years and Reduced MTTR by 91% for tier 1 incidents.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Custom Java Application connects to database: Which one of the 20? 4 41
tomcat administrtor 12 68
Android development question 2 80
Setup GlassFish 4 35
By the end of 1980s, object oriented programming using languages like C++, Simula69 and ObjectPascal gained momentum. It looked like programmers finally found the perfect language. C++ successfully combined the object oriented principles of Simula w…
Introduction This article is the last of three articles that explain why and how the Experts Exchange QA Team does test automation for our web site. This article covers our test design approach and then goes through a simple test case example, how …
Viewers learn about the “for” loop and how it works in Java. By comparing it to the while loop learned before, viewers can make the transition easily. You will learn about the formatting of the for loop as we write a program that prints even numbers…
Viewers will learn about basic arrays, how to declare them, and how to use them. Introduction and definition: Declare an array and cover the syntax of declaring them: Initialize every index in the created array: Example/Features of a basic arr…

733 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question