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When to Use Struct instead of class

When to use struct instead of class in c#?
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Rahamathulla_J
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Rahamathulla_J
1 Solution
 
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing EngineerCommented:
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Jaime OlivaresCommented:
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Göran AnderssonCommented:
In .NET, structures are used to create types with value type semantics. Value types are for example the built in structs like int, long, bool, single and double.

If you are in doubt, don't have any performance problems, or if you just don't know that much about structs, use a class.

A struct should be small (recommended max size is 16 bytes), immutable (doesn't change once it's created), and don't contain references (unless perhaps to strings, which are also immutable).
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administradoresCommented:
In the Visual Studio documentation there is a good explantion of the differences between using Classes or Structures to manage data.

I usually combine structures and classes.
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anarki_jimbelCommented:
I completely agree to GreenGhost  Indeed it's recommended to use structures with max size 16 bytes.
Say, for clarity, it's four integer type fields. Or three integers and couple ofbooleans,Etc. At least these recommendations are given in MS books and I liked GreenGhost answer most..
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administradoresCommented:
This link was good, better that GreenGhost comment for me, sorry, http://www.jaggersoft.com/pubs/StructsVsClasses.htm

The 16byte is not a mystery and as i stated, the good place to undertsand structures, object, classes or whatever is the documentation, but peepz dosen't like ro read it.


If you wanted me to copy paste i'd did...

Classes are reference types and structures are value types. Reference types are allocated on the heap, and memory management is handled by the garbage collector. Value types are allocated on the stack or inline and are deallocated when they go out of scope. In general, value types are cheaper to allocate and deallocate. However, if they are used in scenarios that require a significant amount of boxing and unboxing, they perform poorly as compared to reference types. For more information, see Boxing and Unboxing (C# Programming Guide).

For additional information about value types and reference types, see the Common Type System Overview.

Consider defining a structure instead of a class if instances of the type are small and commonly short-lived or are commonly embedded in other objects.
Do not define a structure unless the type has all of the following characteristics:
It logically represents a single value, similar to primitive types (integer, double, and so on).

It has an instance size smaller than 16 bytes.

It is immutable.

It will not have to be boxed frequently.

If one or more of these conditions are not met, create a reference type instead of a structure. Failure to adhere to this guideline can negatively impact performance.

Portions Copyright 2005 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Portions Copyright Addison-Wesley Corporation. All rights reserved.

For more information on design guidelines, see the "Framework Design Guidelines: Conventions, Idioms, and Patterns for Reusable .NET Libraries" book by Krzysztof Cwalina and Brad Abrams, published by Addison-Wesley, 2005.



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Göran AnderssonCommented:
You don't need to copy, just link to the page:

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229017.aspx
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