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Can i use the local domain Administrator credentials to access the root Domain systems.

Posted on 2007-11-20
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Hi,

I have 1 root domain and 3 child domains.
With thin this i am the admin of 1 child Domain.I have the Domain Administrator credentials.Can we access or login to computers in the other Domains.As each domain has Administrator user and different passwords.
I need to login to that domain with my admin credentials is that possible.

Regards
Sharath
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Question by:bsharath
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Accepted Solution

by:
Alan Huseyin Kayahan earned 1000 total points
ID: 20319677
  Hi Sharath
        You can logon with your credidentals by
          yourusername@rootdomain.com

Regards
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Expert Comment

by:KCTS
ID: 20319736
By definition domain admins only have admin privilages in their domain. If toy want to be able to administer the root domain you will need an account in the root domain or an account that is a member of Enterprise Admins
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Expert Comment

by:SteveH_UK
ID: 20319762
Each domain is a security and administrative boundary.  Because your account is in a child domain, it does not automatically have any particular rights in the other domains.

However, because your domains are linked, Active Directory does trust your credentials and identity.  This means that your child-domain account can be given permissions in the other domains, including both Domain User and Domain Admin.  But, you don't get any permissions by default, except membership in Authenticated Users and Everyone groups.

So whether you can access resources, or log in to computers, is entirely dependent on the settings of those computers and the domains in which they reside.
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Expert Comment

by:SteveH_UK
ID: 20319771
KCTS is correct in saying that you could be given Enterprise Admins membership, but that is overkill for most solutions, particularly since your account is in a child domain already.
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Expert Comment

by:SteveH_UK
ID: 20319779
If you need admin access to all systems in the root domain, then you should be added to the root domain's Domain Admins group.
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Expert Comment

by:SteveH_UK
ID: 20319784
But that would effectively give you Enterprise Admin rights as you could change the membership of that group!
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Expert Comment

by:Alan Huseyin Kayahan
ID: 20319905
  I assume (That is what I understood) he already has these credidentals but wants to logon with that credidentals on a computer/server which is in child domain.
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Author Comment

by:bsharath
ID: 20319937
Yes Mrhusy i already have the credentials.I just need to login to computers in the root Domain....
or access \\machinename\c$ shares....
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Assisted Solution

by:SteveH_UK
SteveH_UK earned 1000 total points
ID: 20320046
OK.

In that case, then logging in with a root domain account works.  You may want to use the Windows 2000/XP/2003 runas command.  You can do this as shown in the snippet below.

Note that I tend to use Internet Explorer to access remote shares as another user, but this no longer works since IE 7.  A generic admin account can use a command prompt, though, which also lets you gain access to MMC snap-ins and file systems.
runas /user:account@rootdomain.tld C:\WINDOWS\system32\cmd.exe
 
(of course if your Windows directory is elsewhere, e.g. WINNT, you will need to change this command accordingly)

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Author Closing Comment

by:bsharath
ID: 31410113
Thanks a lot....
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