Solved

Hiding messages during boot

Posted on 2007-11-20
5
4,142 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi,

I have a linux Debian system with a grub boot loader where I would like to hide all the messages that is output to console during boot. I do not necessarily have to hide the output made initially by grub but rather the system information displayed after grub.

What should I do?

Sincerely
Joakim
0
Comment
Question by:drexl
5 Comments
 
LVL 43

Expert Comment

by:ravenpl
ID: 20320280
I'm not familiar with debian, but other systems supports "quiet" kernel option
0
 
LVL 20

Assisted Solution

by:nedvis
nedvis earned 50 total points
ID: 20320402
You should install and enable GRUB bootsplash which will put GRUB-splashimages on your screen practically hiding kernell boot messages.
Depending on your Debian Linux version you should select appropriate packages
and install them.
Here you can find other ( fancy) bootsplash packages ( remember both
Debian and Ubuntu use xpm.gz formatted images ).
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=278396&highlight=grub+splash
One more place to find the way around:
http://www.bootsplash.org/Debian#Debian_Bootsplash_Themes  and
http://bstheme.sourceforge.net/


0
 

Author Comment

by:drexl
ID: 20327578
Well,

Thank you for your suggestions.

Ravenpl: the quiet kernel option does a little, but in my case not that much.

nedvis: If I'm not mistaken, your suggestion involves downloading a new kernel. I'd rather have my own kernel.

Is there no way to just suppress the messages by somehow temporarily pointing /dev/console to /dev/null during boot?
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:nedvis
ID: 20331959
You should try passing "quiet" parameter /option  to kernel when booting system.
                            Usually, parameters are passed to the kernel when it is invoked from a boot file such as the GRUB or LILO configuration file ( usually located in /boot/grub/grub.conf )
Kernel boot option "quiet" will suppress/disable all log messages.
      Set the default kernel log level to KERN_WARNING (4), which
      suppresses all messages during boot except extremely serious ones.
      (Log levels are defined under the loglevel parameter.)
Please have look at this chapter ( Kernel Boot Command-Line Parameter Reference )
http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/gregkh/lkn/lkn_pdf/ch09.pdf
for detailed instructions.
As its stated there :
"There are three ways to pass options to the kernel and thus control its behavior:
ʉۢ When building the kernel. Most of this book discusses these options.
ʉۢ When starting the kernel. Usually, parameters are passed to the kernel when
    it is invoked from a boot file such as the GRUB or LILO configuration file.
ʉۢ At runtime, by writing to files in the /proc and /sys directories."
You'll hopefully be able to get around the problem by editing grub.conf file and adding
"guiet" option to your  command line for booting your kernel.
 





0
 
LVL 10

Accepted Solution

by:
Luxana earned 75 total points
ID: 20337348
HI drexl,


Here is a complete guide how to setup bootsplash on Debian.
http://www.linuxconfig.org/Setup_Bootsplash_on_Debian_-_grub_silent_or_verbose_boot_mode
0

Featured Post

How your wiki can always stay up-to-date

Quip doubles as a “living” wiki and a project management tool that evolves with your organization. As you finish projects in Quip, the work remains, easily accessible to all team members, new and old.
- Increase transparency
- Onboard new hires faster
- Access from mobile/offline

Join & Write a Comment

The purpose of this article is to fix the unknown display problem in Linux Mint operating system. After installing the OS if you see Display monitor is not recognized then we can install "MESA" utilities to fix this problem or we can install additio…
I. Introduction There's an interesting discussion going on now in an Experts Exchange Group — Attachments with no extension (http://www.experts-exchange.com/discussions/210281/Attachments-with-no-extension.html). This reminded me of questions tha…
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.

707 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

13 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now