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Hiding messages during boot

Posted on 2007-11-20
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi,

I have a linux Debian system with a grub boot loader where I would like to hide all the messages that is output to console during boot. I do not necessarily have to hide the output made initially by grub but rather the system information displayed after grub.

What should I do?

Sincerely
Joakim
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Question by:drexl
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5 Comments
 
LVL 43

Expert Comment

by:ravenpl
ID: 20320280
I'm not familiar with debian, but other systems supports "quiet" kernel option
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Assisted Solution

by:nedvis
nedvis earned 50 total points
ID: 20320402
You should install and enable GRUB bootsplash which will put GRUB-splashimages on your screen practically hiding kernell boot messages.
Depending on your Debian Linux version you should select appropriate packages
and install them.
Here you can find other ( fancy) bootsplash packages ( remember both
Debian and Ubuntu use xpm.gz formatted images ).
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=278396&highlight=grub+splash
One more place to find the way around:
http://www.bootsplash.org/Debian#Debian_Bootsplash_Themes  and
http://bstheme.sourceforge.net/


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Author Comment

by:drexl
ID: 20327578
Well,

Thank you for your suggestions.

Ravenpl: the quiet kernel option does a little, but in my case not that much.

nedvis: If I'm not mistaken, your suggestion involves downloading a new kernel. I'd rather have my own kernel.

Is there no way to just suppress the messages by somehow temporarily pointing /dev/console to /dev/null during boot?
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LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:nedvis
ID: 20331959
You should try passing "quiet" parameter /option  to kernel when booting system.
                            Usually, parameters are passed to the kernel when it is invoked from a boot file such as the GRUB or LILO configuration file ( usually located in /boot/grub/grub.conf )
Kernel boot option "quiet" will suppress/disable all log messages.
      Set the default kernel log level to KERN_WARNING (4), which
      suppresses all messages during boot except extremely serious ones.
      (Log levels are defined under the loglevel parameter.)
Please have look at this chapter ( Kernel Boot Command-Line Parameter Reference )
http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/gregkh/lkn/lkn_pdf/ch09.pdf
for detailed instructions.
As its stated there :
"There are three ways to pass options to the kernel and thus control its behavior:
ʉۢ When building the kernel. Most of this book discusses these options.
ʉۢ When starting the kernel. Usually, parameters are passed to the kernel when
    it is invoked from a boot file such as the GRUB or LILO configuration file.
ʉۢ At runtime, by writing to files in the /proc and /sys directories."
You'll hopefully be able to get around the problem by editing grub.conf file and adding
"guiet" option to your  command line for booting your kernel.
 





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Accepted Solution

by:
Luxana earned 75 total points
ID: 20337348
HI drexl,


Here is a complete guide how to setup bootsplash on Debian.
http://www.linuxconfig.org/Setup_Bootsplash_on_Debian_-_grub_silent_or_verbose_boot_mode
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