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Solaris find files in directory that don't start with T or P

Posted on 2007-11-21
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Hi
Can I use the unix find command to find files in a directory that DONT start with either a T or P
Thanks


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Question by:daveyu
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omarfarid earned 500 total points
ID: 20327758
Hi,

If I got your question correct, then try

find /dir -name "[!PT]*"
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by:Talmash
ID: 20327954
!P might be aliased to the last command started with P (and probably will return: PT: Event not found)

find <dir> -type f | grep -v '/P' | grep -v '/T'

you may add -maxdepth 1, BEFORE  "-type f" for search NOT in subdirectories

tal
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by:omarfarid
ID: 20328016
Hi,

Talmash:

Which shell that will go into the "[!PT*]" to subistitue a last command?

Did you try it?

Thanks
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by:gheist
ID: 20330196
Please explain your logic - has directory name to not begin with TP or filename? Do you need diving into subdirs?
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by:Tintin
ID: 20330624
Talmash.

I echo the comments of omarfarid.  While it's true that if your shell is bash and you use ! in some commands, eg: sed, bash will interpret this as the history recall function, but in the command omarfarid gave, this isn't the case.

Additionally, Solaris find doesn't support the -maxdepth option.  

One final point, on systems that do have GNU find, it's not important where the -maxdepth option is specified.  It certainly doesn't have to go before -type f

:-)
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by:Murugesan Nagarajan
ID: 20598264
find command usage at "ksh" shell at the following platforms:
Linux
      find $PWD -type f -regex  ".[^T|P]*"
AIX
      find $PWD -type f \( -name "[!T|P]*" \)
HP-UX
      find $PWD -type f \( -name "[!T|P]*" \)
SunOS
      find $PWD -type f \( -name "[!T|P]*" \)
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