Solved

Unix: Why is Hosts file NOT case-sensitive?

Posted on 2007-11-21
6
2,009 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-23
Hi all!

I have a question that's bugging me!

Does anyone know why the /etc/hosts file on a Unix system is NOT case-sensitive?

As we all know, Unix systems are case-sensitive, so I wonder how this slipped through the net!

The reason I ask, is because it's actually causing me some hassle as the hosts file on one of my Network Management Systems is used in an import script for use by another system - The applications ARE case-sensitive this mis-match, means I have a bug to fix!

Any explanation of this would be interesting, because it just seems wierd to me!

Many thanks for any insight on this

Thanks

Marcus
0
Comment
Question by:marcusjones
6 Comments
 
LVL 61

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 20327229
Is this homework question?
0
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
Jeff Darling earned 50 total points
ID: 20327511
If you are refering to host names in the hosts file, they are not sensitive to case.

RFC1035 sec 2.3.1 <http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1035.txt>

"Note that while upper and lower case letters are allowed in domain
names, no significance is attached to the case. That is, two names with
the same spelling but different case are to be treated as if identical."
0
 
LVL 61

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 20327853
Some old systems require tld to be capital, but who cares nowadays.
0
3 Use Cases for Connected Systems

Our Dev teams are like yours. They’re continually cranking out code for new features/bugs fixes, testing, deploying, testing some more, responding to production monitoring events and more. It’s complex. So, we thought you’d like to see what’s working for us.

 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:omarfarid
ID: 20327911
Hi,

Why you are linking hostnames to UNIX? This has to do with networking! Networking protocols are not developed by UNIX developers. They are used on many systems.

0
 

Author Comment

by:marcusjones
ID: 20327940
To ghiest:

No this is not a homework question! I explained in the original post, this behaviour actually means that 'sloppy' entries in the hosts file on one system, then cause problems with an application on another system, because the hosts file is used as an input file for another script

Hosts files may not be case-sensitive, but many COTS software products are, so when you're integrating many disparate systems this can present problems


To jeffid:

Thanks for your reply. That's exactly what I needed to know. As it's in this RFC, I can now see why they decided to make the hosts file case-insensitive also

At least if anyone asks what the problem is, I'll be able to explain it a little more fully now :)
0
 

Author Comment

by:marcusjones
ID: 20327982
To omarfarid:

I linked it to Unix, because it was a 'Unix Networking' question. My question was directly related to case-sensitivity of the hosts file on a Unix System

If seemed like reasonable logic to me...
0

Featured Post

Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Even if you have implemented a Mobile Device Management solution company wide, it is a good idea to make sure you are taking into account all of the major risks to your electronic protected health information (ePHI).
Meet the world's only “Transparent Cloud™” from Superb Internet Corporation. Now, you can experience firsthand a cloud platform that consistently outperforms Amazon Web Services (AWS), IBM’s Softlayer, and Microsoft’s Azure when it comes to CPU and …
This video shows how to set up a shell script to accept a positional parameter when called, pass that to a SQL script, accept the output from the statement back and then manipulate it in the Shell.
Viewers will learn how to connect to a wireless network using the network security key. They will also learn how to access the IP address and DNS server for connections that must be done manually. After setting up a router, find the network security…

863 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

20 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now