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How do I create a pxe boot menu ?

Posted on 2007-11-21
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Last Modified: 2012-08-13
How do I create a pxe boot menu ?  I am in a standard Microsoft envirement, 2003 server etc.  

Can you show me a some examples ?   Is there a freeware editor out there ?

Thank you.

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Question by:itguy411
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by:bsharath
ID: 20328990
Are you talking about wake on Lan
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by:robocat
ID: 20329036
You'll need a PXE boot server, e.g. Windows RIS. The RIS server will offer the option of installing serveral installation images and comes for free with windows server

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/reskit/distrib/dsed_dpl_atjs.mspx?mfr=true

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by:itguy411
ID: 20330087
I need to write the pxe menu.  

You can pick where you boot from.  

Regards;

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by:itguy411
ID: 20330095
It is part of the intel "wired for managment" program.  
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by:itguy411
ID: 20330396
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by:alextoft
ID: 20330738
Blimey, that all sounds ridiculously complicated.

In Linux you just create a text file which acts as your menu (can also use a graphical file if required), then another file in GRUB format to denote the menu choices. Takes about 5 minutes...

http://syslinux.zytor.com/pxe.php
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by:itguy411
ID: 20368589
I still am having diffaculty getting this.  I can write a .cfg file but how to I get the boot process to "see" it ?  
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quagz1 earned 500 total points
ID: 20416003
Here is a fantastic "how to" for creating a PXE boot menu: http://mkeadle.org/?p=120

To get client machines to boot from PXE you have to:

1) Configure your DHCP Server to additionally broadcast: bootfile, bootfilesize, bootserver, etc... These values tell the client machine where to look for the PXE software you are trying to load.

2) Create and load the PXE image (which you specified in the DHCP configuration) onto the PXE server.

Unfortunately, the above "how to" is not win2003 oriented; but it is still very relevant.

Here is how to configure DHCP:
http://unattended.sourceforge.net/pxe-win2k.html

I have successfully configured our Win2003 servers to allow PXE clients to boot straight into a ghost session called "pxe".
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Author Closing Comment

by:itguy411
ID: 31410396
Great solution
Thank you very much  
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