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Can I control the route my traffic takes without adding hardware?

Posted on 2007-11-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I host my server at a multi-homed datacenter, but I want to be able to control what backbone and/or route it takes to get to another address. Is this possible? I assume it is possible if I add some sort of networking hardware, but is it possible with some kind of software running on the box?

This is really important to my business, and so any advice would really be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:timdr
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Brugh earned 500 total points
ID: 20332236
Yes.  You can do that by manipulating your routing tables on the sever.

If its windows and you say you have multiple "gateways" that the server can use.

So you could open a command prompt.
Type
route print  <enter>
This will show you all the "routes" you system knows about.
the Default route of 0.0.0.0 will be used for ALL traffic that isn't specifically mentioned in a routing statement.

What you want to do to manipulate this is;
1 - Find out the IP addresses of the Gateways that you have available to you.  (may have to get that from your Datacenter)
2 - Figure out which "gateway" you want to route through. (which backbone)
3 - Figure out the destination address that you are sending the packets too. (IP or subnet address of the destination)
3 - Open command prompt.
Type route add <Destination> MASK 255.255.255.255 <Gateway IP>

Microsoft Write up.
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/sag_tcpip_pro_addstaticroute.mspx?mfr=true

HTH

 - Brugh
 
route add
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by:Brugh
ID: 20332251
Forgot to mention.
For the MASK you will need to match the mask with the Destination IP.  Meaning, if you are creating a route to reach a single address, you would use 255.255.255.255.  If you are creating a route to reach an entire subnet (grouping of common IPs) you wil lthen need to use the same mask as the destination subnet.  (ex, 255.255.255.0)

 - Brugh
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