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Adding a PTR Record

Hi,
We have installed a new mail server and have a slight problem sending some mails to certain people, not everyone (mainly AOL) Receving error Could not deliver the message in the time limit specified.  Please retry or contact your administrator.domain 4.4.7

We have worked out this is due to us not have a PTR record for our IP address. How do we add this? We host our own exchange and DNS server (Win SBS) Do we amend our DNS server? Or amend our DNS records?
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carrgater31
Asked:
carrgater31
1 Solution
 
airnikeCommented:
u might wanna check ur DNS configuration
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

Hey,

PTR Records are generally something you must request your ISP (internet connection provider) to add for you. It's very very rare to find responsibility for that delegated down so unlikely to be something you have to change locally.

Before doing so, you should check that your server sends out on a nice name (because that's what we need the PTR Record to point to).

Open up Exchange System Manager and go to:
 - Administrative groups
 - Servers
 - Your server
 - Protocols
 - SMTP
 - Virtual Server then open Properties

Select the Deliver tab then click Advanced and see what you have for the FQDN of your mail server.

Ideally you want that name to be a public one, i.e. mail.yourdomain.com, that name should have a DNS entry in Public DNS for your domain pointing it to the Public IP Address it sends mail out on. e.g.:

mail.yourdomain.com  A  212.213.214.215

If you change this you will have to restart the Virtual SMTP Server to see it take effect. You can check it's taken the change by running:

telnet mail.yourdomain.com 25
quit

Which should show you the SMTP banner it uses.

Then the Public IP Address should have an entry with your ISP which tells it the IP Address maps to mail.yourdomain.com. That one will look like this (on their end):

215.214.213.212.in-addr.arpa.  PTR  mail.yourdomain.com.

You would simply need to tell them the IP (the right way around, not written as above) and the name.

Chris
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CircleblueCommented:
Carr,

The post above is correct.  I think you might have a couple of things mixed up in your terminology.  While it is true your SBS server is a DNS server, it is a LOCAL DNS server, not an INTERNET DNS Server.  Your ISP should be managing your domain name.  Contact them and let them know you would like to see if there is a domain name associated with your exchange server IP address.  If not they should know what to do.  

1)  Create an A record that says mail.companyname.com = MAIL SERVER ADDRESS
2)  Change MX record to point to mail.companyname.com as primary mail server

That is it pretty much and make sure they create a reverse lookup record too.  (That is what kills a lot of mail when there is no reverse lookup.)

Go to IPTOOLS.com if you need to check your domain name lookups.

Cheers,

Brian
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Jon GieseCommented:
another ptr issue
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