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ADP - Must Declare the Scalar Varaible

Posted on 2007-11-22
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Last Modified: 2013-12-05
I am having difficulty with a ADP project, specifically regarding ADO / SQL usage.

I'm currently in the process of writing a function to return a resultset from a SQL table (SQL Server 2005), the code is fairly simple (see attached example).

The problem line looks to be: "Set rs_ = .Execute"... it throws the following error: "Must Declare the Scalar Variable @id".

I have tried to use '?' marks instead, but no luck; does anyone have any ideas (short of creating a stored procedure!).

Cheers
Function Example()
On Error GoTo ErrorHandler:
 
Dim command_ As New ADODB.Command
Dim rs_ As ADODB.Recordset
 
    With command_
    
        .ActiveConnection = CurrentProject.Connection
        .NamedParameters = True
        .CommandType = adCmdText
        .CommandText = "SELECT t.* FROM ticket t WHERE t.id = @id"
        
        .Parameters.Append .CreateParameter("@id", adInteger, adParamInput, , 11)
        
        Set rs_ = .Execute
        
        With rs_
        
            If .State = adStateOpen Then
            
                ' TODO: this bit!
            
            End If
        End With
    End With
    
Tidy:
 
    Set command_ = Nothing
    Set rs_ = Nothing
    
Exit Function
ErrorHandler:
 
    Debug.Print Err.Description: GoTo Tidy
 
End Function

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Question by:MISLtd
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6 Comments
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Kelvin Sparks
ID: 20333437
Replace "SELECT t.* FROM ticket t WHERE t.id = @id"

with

"SELECT t.* FROM ticket t WHERE t.id = " & the vale for @ID.

IF @ID is text then

"SELECT t.* FROM ticket t WHERE t.id = '" & @ID & "'"
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:MISLtd
ID: 20333538
While that would work, it leaves things a fairly open to SQL injection attacks as the @id parameter will be generated by user input.
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Kelvin Sparks
ID: 20333549
OK, but you haven't said where @ID is coming from. What you have in the adp is a statement that will be executed. Using ADO you have to pass these parameters in from somewhere.

You are using adCmdText. This just executes the string you create
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:MISLtd
ID: 20333617
I gave the '?' mark another go and seem to have solved the problem.
Function Example()
On Error GoTo ErrorHandler:
 
Dim command_ As New ADODB.Command
Dim rs_ As ADODB.Recordset
 
    With command_
    
        .ActiveConnection = CurrentProject.Connection
        .NamedParameters = True
        .CommandType = adCmdText
        .CommandText = "SELECT t.* FROM ticket t WHERE t.id = ?"
        
        .Parameters.Append .CreateParameter("id", adInteger, adParamInput, , 11)
        
        Set rs_ = .Execute
        
        With rs_
        
            If .State = adStateOpen Then
            
                ' TODO: this bit!
            
            End If
        End With
    End With
    
Tidy:
 
    Set command_ = Nothing
    Set rs_ = Nothing
    
Exit Function
ErrorHandler:
 
    Debug.Print Err.Description: GoTo Tidy
 
End Function

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