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Needing Instructions to Enable File Sharing Between Two Computers

Posted on 2007-11-24
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Hi Everyone:

       I have three pc's at home.  Two have a direct ethernet connection to a Linksys G Wireless Broadband Router (Model WRT54G) while the third one has a wireless connection to the router.  
In any case, I wish to enable file sharing between the two pc's which have a direct ethernet connection to the router.  One pc has Windows XP Pro SP2 on it while the other has Windows 2000 Professional SP4 on it.  

      Any step by step instructions for enabling file sharing between these two pc's will greatly be appreciated.  

       Thank you

        George
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Question by:GMartin
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ALNMOO earned 150 total points
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by:rindi
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Make sure the user accounts of the other PC's exist on all PC's along with the password. On the XP PC make sure "Use Simple File Sharing" is disabled in the Folder Options (control panel). On both PC's select "Network Connections" in the Control Panel, right click the "Local Area Network", "Properties" and make sure "File and Printer sharing for Microsoft Networks" is set to on. Select tcp ip, properties, and give every PC it's own static IP (don't use auto).

Now right click a folder you want to share, select "Sharing and security", enable "Share this folder", give it a share name, select "Permissions", for everyone make sure "Full Control" is enabled, click on "OK", select the "Security" tab, and add those user accounts you want to allow access, along with the write or just read permissions.

Now to connect to the shares, on the PC you want to connect with, open explorer, select "Tools", "Map Network Drive", select an unused drive letter, and for folder enter

\\IpAddressOfOtherPC\ShareName

After that you can use that drive letter which is on the other PC.
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by:GMartin
ID: 20344965
Hi

      Thanks so much for the followups.  I do have a couple of  followup questions regarding the entries of static IP addresses.  When I plug in a static IP address, do I use what is given within the results of ipconfig or do I arbratrarily make up one?  And, secondly, will the ones entered have any kind of curtailing effect on the IP addresses being assigned by the router to access  the internet?

       George

           

         
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by:rindi
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Check the settings on the Router (login to it using your webbrowser). Now check the settings for DHCP. If it has a range of 192.168.1.50 to 192.168.1.100, give your IP's something that isn't within that scope. I'd then use something like 192.168.1.5 and 192.168.1.10 (it also has to be different from the IP of the router, which is probably 192.168.1.1).  The subnet mask should be 255.255.255.0, the gateway is the IP of the router, and the DNS Server is also the router's IP.
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by:Andrej Pirman
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Hi GMartin,
when assigning static IP's:
- you can use any IP inside of same subnet range of your router, for example, if you router has 192.168.0.1 and subnet mask 255.255.255.0, you may choose any IP from 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254 for your machines
- under IP settings of your machine, enter IP of your router, in this example 192.168.0.1, for Gateway
- under DNS servers you may try and enter IP of your router. If it does not work, enter IP of your ISP provider's DNS servers

All these data you may obtain from ipconfig /all
And there is no reason to use same static IPs as delivered from DHCP - just keep in mind not to use same IP for 2 machines.
You may also use your own rule for IP assignation, for example, in range 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.254, use IPs from (last segment) .10 to .100 for your static machines (you will use 2 of them), and then setup your router's DHCP to assign IPs from .100 to .150 automatically (for wireless, for example). That way you may have your notebook on wireless to obtain IP automatically from DHCP.

Regarding file sharing:
- under properties of your network adapter (LAN or Wireless Card) assure you have "File and Printer Sharing" enabled under protocols
- if you want to resolve machines by name instead of IP, for example \\MACHINE_NAME\Share_name, enable "Dafault NetBIOS settings" under TCP/IP advanced settings -> WINS of your LAN connection
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by:Andrej Pirman
ID: 20345086
I forgot to mention - file sharing issue was commented before by others, so reward them, if they helped :)
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by:GMartin
ID: 20347079
Hi Everyone:

      I have gone through all of my router settings, but, I can not find exactly where to adjust the IP Address Range.  The closest option I have found similiar to the concept of IP Address Range Adjustment is within a section called Applications and Gaming.  There is an area called IP Address Forwarding where beginning and ending IP addresses can manually be entered.  However, I do not believe this is the area which needs addressing.

       In any case, I think I understand the concept behind all of this.  The router's IP address is 192.168.1.1 within a subnet of 255.255.255.0.  Each pc on the wireless does have a unique IP address ending with a set of three digits.  Since the starting IP address is 192.168.1.100 and up to 50 DHCP users can be assigned, it is logical to assume the IP address range in this particular situation would be 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150.  And, if I understand the gist of what has been discussed so far, whatever IP address is used by the pc, it must fall within this range and must be "different" from all other pc's on the wireless.  While all pcs must have a unique IP address, they must have the same workgroup or SSID name.  

          I hope I have these conclusions correct.  If not, can someone correct me on any misconception?  
If everyone can go over these conclusions drawn for accuracy, I will greatly appreciate it.  After all, I am trying to learn about the configuration of the router as I go along with things.

        Thank you

        George
       
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by:rindi
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The applications and gaming has nothing to do with the dhcp range. Use Ip's that aren't being delivered by the DHCP server, because otherwise it is possible that something new gets the same IP that you have assigned to a PC. This causes problems and conflicts. If your PC gets an IP of 192.168.1.100 when it get's it's IP automatically, then it's likely that that is the lowest IP the DHCP server can assign. So give it something lower which probably isn't served from the DHCP server. Use something like 192.168.1.10 for that PC.
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by:Andrej Pirman
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GMartin,
partially you get things right, but the other part is:
- as RINDI already said, DHCP stands for "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol" which is opposite to "Static Configuration". So if you feel a need to statically assign IPs to any machine in your LAN, avoid IP range of DHCP and stick within SUBNET range of your network (subnet range is defined by "masking" available addresses in range - 255 masks all IP's and particular IP octet must match, while 0 masks none and this particular IP octet may vary from 0 to 254)
- to have your home network visible between users, they must be in same SUBNET and preferably in same WORKGROUP. SSID has nothing to do with it.
- SSID is kind of Wireless access point NAME, visible to wireless clients. If many access points, they must have the same SSID name to be able to pass clients between them. SSID is also for easier recognition of particular wireless access point.
- regarding SHARING - if you have NTFS permissions in work (you must disable "Enable simple file sharing" option) permissions to access to some shared folder are the junction of permissions set under Security tab and under Sharing -> Permissions tab.

Hope this renders sharing and networking a bit less confusing :)
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Author Closing Comment

by:GMartin
ID: 31410835
Hi Everyone:

        Thanks so much for the insightful feedback provided to this post.  Using the informative link provided which gave all of the necessary steps in conjunction with the added suggestions, everything is much clearer now.

        Many thanks for a job so well done.

       George
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