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Backup solution for MPLS cloud

I am looking for a backup solution for a company that has five different branches. The company and its branches are connected through MPLS cloud, these branches are connected to MPLS cloud at varies bandwidth from 512 up to 4 Mbps.

What are the recommended backup solution for such environment?

At this stage there is no much data on each site that will consume current bandwidths (I do not have any other informations about what applications are being used).

If  I am looking for online backup (via MPLS WAN from branches to the main office). I know we have got other option which is tape backup (offsite).

I have had a look at the following:

Symantec Backup Exec

Idealstor iBac

EMC Retrospect

Yosmite

Commvault

Could you please recommend any other solutions.

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zillah
Asked:
zillah
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5 Solutions
 
robocatCommented:

How much data do you need to backup ?
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bhanukir7Commented:
Hi,

it depends on how much amount of data that you need to backup and what are the kind of the applications you are trying to backup. Do you intend to backup or maintain applications like exchange, sql, oracle, file servers, DC.  If that is the case you can think of High availability solutions like CA ARCserve as a backup solutinn and CA Wansync as a high availability solution. Taking into consideration the
bandwidth and differnt sites, it is not a good idea to backup over the WAN links as the backups would not be very successfull and would clog your network.

Good thing would be to setup backup servers dedicated for each site and bring the tapes from those sites and copy them and send them back to the sites.
Which way you can have a central location with data and backups running at all sites.

You can check with CA with your specific environment in mind and find out the possible options with arcserve and Wansync

bhanu
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zillahAuthor Commented:
>>How much data do you need to backup ?<<
Unfortunatly if I would have known , I would have posted here, therefore I said :
"I do not have any other informations about what applications are being used"

But all I can say that let us assume that cuurent bandwidth is sufficient.
 
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zillahAuthor Commented:
>>it is not a good idea to backup over the WAN links as the backups would not be very successfull and would clog your network<<
Yep, you are right.
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robocatCommented:

>Unfortunatly if I would have known , I would have posted here.

You should try to find out how much storage is in use on the different sites to get a meaningful answer to your question.

Also, how many employees are there in this company and what are they willing to invest?

I wouldn't preclude a backup over a WAN, e.g. using disk-to-disk backup solutions that use one single full (onsite) backup and from then on differential backups (indefinetely). Such a solution needs to perform block level backups instead of file level backups.

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andyalderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
Take a look at eVault, after initial (full) replication it only replicates the delta (smaller than incrementals) to the central backup server. Initial replication and restores can be done by USB disk created on the central backup server if bandwidth is low.
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philosinfinityCommented:
CommVault would be a good solution if you want to perform replication back to the host site and backup the replicated host.  It would also be good for backups if you do not mind housing the backup hardware in each remote office.  From there, you could aux copy across the WAN (throttled if you so choose).

CommVault uses a main server called the CommServe to link other servers called Media Agents to a central backup scheme.  The Media Agent houses a backup target and all backup jobs are assigned a Media Agent to copy to.  In your case, you would want to house the CommServe in the central office, and a Media Agent in each remote office as well as one in the central office.  Each server would get an agent installed on it and it would backup to the Media Agent in its site.  If you want an additional, centralized copy of the backup, you can tell the Media Agents to make a secondary copy (after the primary copy has already been created) and point the the central site's Media Agent as the target.
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zillahAuthor Commented:
>>In your case, you would want to house the CommServe in the central office<<
That is fine.

>>and a Media Agent in each remote office<<
This is fine.

>> Each server would get an agent installed on it and it would backup to the Media Agent in its site..<<
Are you saying that each remote site should have standalone server for the purpose of a backup, and  that server (on each remote location) would have software called Media Agent installed ?

>>as well as one in the central office.<<
Is this for the purpose of  a secondary copy only, does that mean without the Media Agent in the central office I can not have secondary copy ?
And If I do not need to have a secondary backup copy, does that mean we do not need to use the Media Agent in the central office ?

Thanks
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philosinfinityCommented:
>>Are you saying that each remote site should have standalone server for the purpose of a backup, and  that server (on each remote location) would have software called Media Agent installed ?

Yes... Unless you either have a server with a very light load, that can be dual purpsed (existing load + media agent software).

>>Is this for the purpose of  a secondary copy only, does that mean without the Media Agent in the central office I can not have secondary copy ?

Well, to backup the servers in the central office you will need a media agent.  This can technically be the same server that the CommServe software is running on, however, there will be a bit of a performance loss.  Also, without a Media Agent in the central office, you could still have a secondary copy by deploying a NAS and running the secondary copy to it.

>>And If I do not need to have a secondary backup copy, does that mean we do not need to use the Media Agent in the central office ?
Only if there are no servers in the central office that need to be backed up.  Otherwise, you will need one in the central office also.

To clarify, the client sends all its data across the network to the media agent.  The purpose of localizing the media agents to each office is so the primary copy does not have to traverse the WAN.
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zillahAuthor Commented:
>>Well, to backup the servers in the central office you will need a media agent. <<
Yes, you are right . I did not think about other servers in the cetral office.

>>To clarify, the client sends all its data across the network to the media agent.  The purpose of localizing the media agents to each office is so the primary copy does not have to traverse the WAN.<<
I did not get that , because I am looking to backup from each remote site to the central office, how would the primary copy not traverse WAN ?could you kindly clarify that ?
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philosinfinityCommented:
Primary copy transfers from client to media agent, which is LAN based... then the secondary copy traverses the WAN to the central location.  That copy can be throttled and whatnot.
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