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What are the cons when change functionality level from mixed to native mode?

Posted on 2007-11-26
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We have a Windows Server 2003 forest that currently contains 8 domain controllers running Windows 2003 server, standard edition, sp2.  Two of these controllers are our ADC and BDC that also function as our DNS and WINS servers.  We also have several member servers which are a combination of Windows Server 2003, standard edition, sp2; WIndows Server 2003 R2, standard edition, sp2; Windows 2000 server, sp4.

Our Forest and domain controllers all currently run in "mixed" mode.  We'd like to change the functionality level to "native" mode for all domain controllers and the forest.  There are NO NT Servers in this Forest.

What, if any, problems can we expect when making this change?  Any residual problems afterward?
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Question by:FUSDtech
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In mixed mode you can have NT, 2000 and 2003 Domain controllers an they will replcate properly. In Win2K mode NT Domain contollers cease to function. In Win2003 Nativem Any Windows 2000 Domain Controllers won't replicate properly.

If you dont have any NT or 2000 Domain controllers its not an issue - member servers don't matter only Domain Controllers - so you can raise both the domain and forest functional levels to Windows 2003 Native.

BTW. You dont have PDC and BDCs in Windows anymore - all copies of active directory are updateable. Changes can be made on any DC and they replicate to the others. By default on DC (the first one), holds certain operations master roles (including a PDC emulator for comapatibility), but there is not such thing as a BDC anymore.

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