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Access: Sorting Months in a query in the correct order

Posted on 2007-11-27
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Last Modified: 2009-01-22
I have a query that sorts out months in the following format:

Field:              Month                
Row1         August 2006                        
Row2         September 2006            
Row3         October 2006                  
Row4         November 2006              
Row5         December 2006
Row6         January 2007
Row7         February 2007
Row8         March 2007
Row9         April 2007
Row10         May 2007
Row11         June 2007
Row12         July 2007
Row13         August 2007

The problem is that sometimes (Unlike above) the months are in the wrong order. How do I sort the month column to insure that the month and year are always in the correct order (As above)            
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Question by:ouestque
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Expert Comment

by:Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]
ID: 20361460
what is the actual input field? is it datetime, or is it already a string in that format.
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Accepted Solution

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Emil_Gray earned 500 total points
ID: 20361505
If you are using a query then it is easy. Create a new field just for sorting purposes. Format your original date field there as follows:

Format([mydate], "yyyymmdd")
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by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 20361532
select * from NameofTable
order by format([Month],"yyyymm)
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by:jerryb30
ID: 20361590
If text, Order By datevalue(MonthAndYear)
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by:Emil_Gray
ID: 20361638
As I said initially since I presume you are using a query create a new field in the query. I'll call it myDate for the purpose of explaining.

Format the field as a Date/Time field. In the query the field would look like myDate: Format([MonthYear], "yyyymmdd") where [MonthYear] is the name of your field in the query that holds the data you are trying to sort. Then you sort the myDate field as you wish.
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by:jerryb30
ID: 20361696
If it is a date field, it will order regardless of how you format.  
If it is a text field, you will not get format to handle it anyway.
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by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 20361758
<If it is a text field, you will not get format to handle it anyway.>

why not try my post.

  select * from NameofTable
order by format([Month],"yyyymm)
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by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 20361778
?format("january 2007","yyyymm")  will give you

200701
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by:jerryb30
ID: 20361795
I am amazed. I bow to your superior intellect. Yet again.
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by:Emil_Gray
ID: 20363599
capricorn1 and jerryb30, if the field showing the Month and Year that the questioner provided is a Date/Time field then the solution I first proposed is the easiest answer. This is not rocket science.

Format a new field as a Date/Time field. In your query the field would look like;

myDate: Format([MonthYear], "yyyymmdd")

where [MonthYear] is the name of your field in the query that holds the data you are trying to sort. Then you sort the myDate field as you wish either Ascending or Descending.
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Author Comment

by:ouestque
ID: 20460500
Thank ya'll so much!!! I really appreciate you help. Emil_Gray posted the correct answer first and therefore she gets the points. Thanks!!!
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by:Emil_Gray
ID: 20460914
ouestque, thank you. However I am a male not a female.

Emil Gray
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Expert Comment

by:cspbarnes
ID: 23442999
And if you looking to only do it for the month, let's say a Birthday list, then you would use
myDate: Format([Month], "mm")
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