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Not allow non-domain computers to access W2K3 file shares regardless of user

The user has rights to access the data on a machine provided to them by us.
They cannot attach a USB drive, burn a CD, or FTP/email out information
without it being flagged/stopped.

So I was asked "What if Joe User brings in his home laptop?"
If a user does, and copies the IP settings from their corporate desktop,
then plugs in their laptop into the same wire and attempts to access a
Windows file share, they are prompted for a username and password. Since they
are a user with valid credentials, they can access the data and
hypothetically copy it and remove it from the building without us knowing.

How can I block a valid user from accessing a file share on a non-AD domain added machine?
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OnvioAdmin
Asked:
OnvioAdmin
1 Solution
 
Renato Montenegro RusticiIT SpecialistCommented:
I dont thing you will achieve that using only AD. You need some switch features like Cisco's Port Security:

http://www.nsa.gov/snac/os/switch-guide-version1_01.pdf

This way, the user cant plug the computer in and therefore, cant access your resources.
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tigermattCommented:
As far as I can see, I agree with the above post. Windows will automatically allow any authenticated user to access files and folders over which they have permissions, regardless of the machine they are working at. The behaviour you are seeing would be expected - when the user does not authenticate, they will be prompted for credentials.

You will need some kind of firewall or feature like what is mentioned in the post above. There's no easy way of achieving this, and even if there is you would need some rather complex, complicated permissions which would start getting over restricive on yourself.

-tigermatt
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Joediggity2Commented:
One possible solution is to use Windows Rights Media.  In reality, the only way to completely lock it down is to only allow access from the specific machine and have no printers or outside communicaitons on that machine.  If someone can see the informaiton on their screen, they can take a screen shot of it (either from windows or using a third party app).  They can then save the screen shots as a different files and do what they want with it.
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LauraEHunterMVPCommented:
You can accomplish this using a combination of Active Directory and an internal PKI by deploying Server and Domain Isolation - only domain-joined computers are issues a particular type of PKI certificate, and if a computer does not possess said it is not allowed to connect to one or more servers that you specify.  SDI is non-trivial to deploy and needs to be fully tested in a lab setting so that you are not inadvertently locking out legitimate users from accessing the resources they need: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/guidance/architectureanddesign/ipsec/default.mspx
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