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Denied GPO

Posted on 2007-11-28
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Last Modified: 2013-11-13
I'm trying to create a GPO to deploy the Office 2007 compatibility pack to computers on the domain.  To test it right now, I've created a temporary OU and put one test computer in it.  I then created the share, put the files in it and applied the everyone group with read access and domain admins full control.  I used RDP to connect to the test computer and verified I could see the files and open them.

Next I created the GPO and setup User Configuration --> Software Settings --> Software Installation, right clicked new --> package.  I selected the .msi file and all seemed well.  The share with the file is on a different server so it isn't a local path on that selection or anything.  

I then did a gpupdate on the DC and the test computer, tried a reboot and all and it just doesn't seem to install.  I then did testing in the group policy management console under "group policy results" and noticed that the policy shows up under Denied GPO's with the reason "empty".  I went and looked at the object again and it is not empty.  I still show that install set in it.  I have the policy turned on, enforced and just to make sure, have the everyone group and domain computer group have full access to it.

I guess I'm looking for suggestions on getting this to work or anything it seems I've done incorrectly thus far.  Thank you in advance for any input.
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Question by:longrealtycompany
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trippleO7 earned 500 total points
ID: 20369337
One thing I notice initially is that you created a Test OU, and put the computer in there, but you created a USER GPO to apply to that computer OU.  This should be a COMPUTER policy (computer configuration) when applying to an OU containing only Computers.  Same for the inverse, User policy (user configuration) for OU containing Users.  And if you have an OU containing both users and computers, then you would apply both policies.

GP Results showed the policy as being empty because there wasn't a correct policy type (user or computer) being applied to that OU.

You can, however, add that user to the Test OU and publish the application in which that user will be able to see it in Add/Remove Programs and install it from there.  Another way would be to just create a computer policy (mentioned above) and assign the package within that policy.  This is probably the easiest, unless you want to user's to have more control of what's being installed.

I've deployed out this same package via AD/GP.  Try the above steps first and we'll go from there.

Rory
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