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Ubuntu Server Linux: I want to automatically set two environmental variables at server startup

Posted on 2007-11-29
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Is there some way for two particular environment variables to be set automatically on server startup?  (CVSROOT and CVS_RSH)

Thanks
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Question by:oxygen_728
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by:Duncan Roe
Duncan Roe earned 150 total points
ID: 20372218
Sure - you can put them in /etc/profile.  The all Bourne-style shell logins will get them (including bash). There's another file if you use csh.
I think you could put them in an early rc file (in /etc/rc.d, varies with distribution) then all processes will get them (because init is the ancestor of all processes). But that's not the usual way.
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by:omarfarid
omarfarid earned 350 total points
ID: 20372233
Hi,

The /etc/profile file will be read when users login to the server. If you want to run a command or tool that will need these variables, then you set then in the script that call these commands or tools.

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by:oxygen_728
ID: 20375199
Can you give me an example of what to put into /etc/profile to set the CVSROOT environment variable?

Do just throw the line "export CVSROOT=VALUE" into the file in a blank line?

Thanks for the help.

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omarfarid earned 350 total points
ID: 20375771
Hi,

The /etc/profile is like the .profile file in the home dir of the user. It is read when the user is logged in and all commands in it are executed in the login shell.

So, it is as you described

But if you want to set variables for jobs / scripts that will run at startup, you need to add such statements to the scripts since the scripts do not read /etc/profile file.
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