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Calculating Swap space

Posted on 2007-11-29
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Hi Folks,

Can anyone let me know what is the actual swap space (in MB) shown in the below output. I'm bit confused in this.

bash-2.03# swap -l
swapfile                     dev          swaplo     blocks      free
/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s1   118,9             16        8194640  8194640
bash-2.03# swap -s
total: 26128k bytes allocated + 5440k reserved = 31568k used, 7514640k available
bash-2.03# uname -a SunOS meridian 5.8 Generic_117350-41 sun4u sparc SUNW,Ultra-Enterprise
bash-2.03#

Thanks,
Ashok
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Question by:rdashokraj
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blu earned 75 total points
ID: 20373160
From the swap -l, you have a bit under 4GB of disk swap specified.
From the swap -s, you have 31MB used, and 7GB available of
total swap. Remember, the swap -s includes disk swap AND ram swap.
So, I would guess that this is a system with about 4 GB of memory and
4GB of disk swap.
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Assisted Solution

by:thigger_uk
thigger_uk earned 50 total points
ID: 20373187
Looks like you have 7546208kbytes of swap total (=7369Mb) of which you've used 31568kbytes (30.8Mb)


See http://wwwcgi.rdg.ac.uk:8081/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/wsi14/poplog/man/1M/swap (or 'man swap') for further info.
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Author Comment

by:rdashokraj
ID: 20373480
Hi Blu,
Please tell me using 'swap -l' command how would i calculate the swap space as the values are given in blocks. How much each block denotes?

Thanks.
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by:thigger_uk
thigger_uk earned 50 total points
ID: 20374003
Blocks are 512 bytes
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Author Comment

by:rdashokraj
ID: 20375218
so it should be calculated as 8194640 * 512 / (1024*1024) = 4001.29 MB, which approx 4GB.

Yes it got it. Thanks for the hint.
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by:rdashokraj
ID: 31411643
Thanking you all.
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