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Missing Documents and Settings folder

Posted on 2007-11-29
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
I have 2 Windows 2003 domain controllers and both are missing the Documents and Settings folder.  The profiles all exist under the c:\winnt\profiles directory, but I need to know why these two servers don't have the Documents and Settings folder.  I just built a new 2003 AD server and the folder is there.
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Question by:ewest111
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l84work earned 250 total points
ID: 20380291
It's probably because those servers were upgraded from NT4.  They are Domain Controllers, most likely left over from your NT4-win2k3 domain migration.  

You should raise your domain level to native. You are going to have to when you want to upgrade to windows 2008.
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by:ewest111
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I'll ask the people who were here before me.  But I know we are running native mode.
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by:ewest111
ID: 20382898
Looks like that's what has happened pre-me.  Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.
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