Solved

windows 2000 upgrade

Posted on 2007-11-29
5
176 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-05
I have a server running windows 2000 advanced server sp4 that is currently in a cluster environment with data on a SAN.  I'd like to upgrade the server to windows 2003 server.  What is the standard practice for upgrading a server that is in a cluster?  I can just failover the drive that is on the SAN to the other server in the cluster, but is there anything else that I should worry about?  Will I loose my cluster data?
0
Comment
Question by:pizza1
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 83

Accepted Solution

by:
oBdA earned 500 total points
ID: 20376925
The standard practice is a "rolling upgrade", which comes down to this: you pause the node to be upgraded, upgrade it, move the resources to the upgraded node, pause the second one, upgrade the second server.
Make sure that you have all necessary drivers at hand when upgrading, and that the BIOSs and firmwares of all(!) components (Mainboard, RAID, HBA, SAN, NICs, ...) involved are W2k3 compatible.
Check especially the "Related Links" at the bottom of this page:
Perform a rolling upgrade from Windows 2000
http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/49f2c886-685b-47f7-b9c4-1f5de50f36d41033.mspx?mfr=true
0
 

Author Comment

by:pizza1
ID: 20377459
I don't plan on upgrading the other server in the cluster at the time.  Can I leave one on 2000 while the other is at 2003?

Thanks for your help.
0
 
LVL 83

Expert Comment

by:oBdA
ID: 20377543
This is definitely *not* recommended. Running different OSs is only supported for a short while during an OS upgrade like this. The time you're running two nodes with different OSs should be as short as possible, as there are major changes to the resource DLLs (and, just in case, note that the web resource isn't supported anymore in W2k3, it has been replaced with a generic script resource).
I'm not even sure if all resources would fail back to the W2k server once they've been owned by the W2k3 machine.
0

Featured Post

Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

The environment that this is running in is SCCM 2007 R2 running on a Windows 2008 R2 server. The PXE Distribution point is running on its own Windows 2008 R2 box. This is what Event viewer showed after trying to start the WDS service:  An erro…
Remote Desktop Protocol or RDP has become an essential tool in many offices. This article will show you how to set up an external IP to point directly to an RDP session. There are many reasons why this is beneficial but perhaps the top reason is con…
This Micro Tutorial hows how you can integrate  Mac OSX to a Windows Active Directory Domain. Apple has made it easy to allow users to bind their macs to a windows domain with relative ease. The following video show how to bind OSX Mavericks to …
As a trusted technology advisor to your customers you are likely getting the daily question of, ‘should I put this in the cloud?’ As customer demands for cloud services increases, companies will see a shift from traditional buying patterns to new…

920 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

13 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now