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How to determine the type of a derived class?

Posted on 2007-11-30
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Last Modified: 2011-09-20
Hi:

To encapsulate data, I've subclassed several of the winform controls:

TextBox --> EWTextBox;
ComboBox --> EWComboBox;
ListBox --> EWListBox;

For generic handling, I store my derived controls in a list based on their common base class:
EWList<Forms.Control> ewTransactionUtilityControls = new EWList<.Forms.Control>();

Later, when I'm processing the list later, I would like to determine the derived class so I can do special processing according to the derived class type:

foreach( Control control in EWList)
{
     // Figure out whether "control" is an EWTextBox, EWComboBox, EWListBox
}

How do I do that?

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Question by:jxbma
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2 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

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Babycorn-Starfish earned 2000 total points
ID: 20383287
try

if( control is ClassName)
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LVL 1

Author Closing Comment

by:jxbma
ID: 31411953
Thanks man... I should have known this.
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