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DIRECTING DOS SOFTWARE LPT1 OUTPUT TO A USB PRINTER

I have a DOS enviornment software which directs print output to the LPT1 port. I want it to print to a USB printer.(Laser/Inkjet). The DOS program sourcecode is written in FOTRAN and compiled to an EXE File. Both the EXE File and Source code in a .FOR file are available with me. The Fotran compiler is not available with me. I would appreciate HELP.
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Rajinder_Kumar_Mody
Asked:
Rajinder_Kumar_Mody
2 Solutions
 
weareitCommented:
How about using the Loopback Adapter:

http://geekswithblogs.net/dtotzke/articles/26204.aspx

-saige-
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nobusCommented:
can this help ?
http://www.dosprn.com/                                    DOS print to USB
http://www.winnetmag.com/Article/ArticleID/39674/39674.html                  usb print from Cmd      
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reinsmmsCommented:
Typically what I do is create a shared printer (or use an existing print queue on a print server) and then MAP the LPT port using the NET USE command.  For instance, from a command prompt:
NET USE LPT1 \\servername\queuename
This connection will be persistant by default,  However windows is never perfect when it comes to maintaining mapped printers, so as a precaution I then use a batch file or login to map the drive on logon just to be sure.
PS - it's OK to have multiple printers pointing to the same port using mapping,  However, if it does cause conflicts, DOS or system level programs typically provide a way to change the destination port (LPT2, or the like)
Hope that helps
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hdhondtCommented:
reinsmms's suggestion works fine if the printer supports PCL (or some other language the DOS program supports).

Unfortunately, most of the current inkjets, as well as many of the low-cost lasers are GDI printers, which rely on Windows to convert the page into pixels. These printers do not support any language, and for those only something like DOSPRN suggested by nobus will work. DOSPRN takes the output from the DOS program, converts it into a page, and feeds that to the Windows diriver to get it printed.
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ridCommented:
I don't see windows version mentioned in the Q, but to print directly to LPT1, wouldn't it have to be like 9X or earlier, before the HAL made such things very tricky? It *might* just be easier to find a printer with a parallel interface...
/RID
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Computer101Commented:
Forced accept.

Computer101
EE Admin
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