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microsoft, exchange, 2003, Reverse DNS

I have a problem with reverse DNS
The topology of my system is as follows:-
My domain  xyz.com has DNS namesevers with 123-reg
The records include the following entries
A * 1111.2222.3333.4444
A @ 1111.2222.3333.4444
A mail 5555.6666.7777.8888
CNAME ftp = www
A www = 1111.2222.3333.4444
MX Record is MAIL Priority is 10

1111.2222.3333.4444 is the IP adress of my virtual server host with Webfusion I have control panel access to this server that also runs a DNS service. This server hosts my website

5555.6666.7777.8888 is the static IP address allocated to my Microsoft SBS 2003 server in my office by My adsl broadband provider, presumably they also run a DNS service

My Microsoft SBS 2003 server runs MSExchange 2003 for both incoming and outgoing SMTP email
Outgoing mail is resolved directly to the recipients doamin name  IE Not forwarded through any smarthost.

My problem is that two ISP's AOL and Yahoo will not deliver mail to anyone@theirdomains without having reverse dns enabled.

Firstly, I am confused as to which DNS records need to be set up and where.
I am correct in asuming that it is the records at 123-reg are the only ones that need altering?
I am advised that 123-reg servers do not support reverseDNS short of moving all my domains (I have 47 of them !!) to another provider Is there anything else I can do

Secondly, if it is possible to do something what entries do I need to make

0
cpmcomputers
Asked:
cpmcomputers
1 Solution
 
BudDurlandCommented:
The reverse DNS (PTR) records need to be configured / maintained by whoever "owns" the IP address. In the case if your mail server, that's your ISP.  You'll need to ask your ISP to create a PTR (reverse DNS) record in their DNS server for 5555.6666.7777.8888.  Preferably, it will resolve to the host name that your Exchange server uses in it's mail greetings (mail.example.com)
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