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Let a click "fall through"

I have a PictureBox (MAIN), upon which I am drawing a bunch of smaller PictureBoxes (and assigning as their parent, the larger PictureBox), such that they completely overlap the parent PictureBox.

The problem I have run into now is I have signed-up for the OnClick for the MAIN PictureBox -- but it is not being processed because the click is happening on one of the child PictureBoxes and is never "reaching" the Parent (MAIN) PictureBox.  How can I let the click "fall through" and get processed by the Parent?
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Tom Knowlton
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Tom Knowlton
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1 Solution
 
Jaime OlivaresSoftware ArchitectCommented:
on the child's picturebox event, you can retrasmit the event manually. Derive your own picturebox class




public class ChildPictureBox : PictureBox
{
      protected override void OnClick(EventArgs e)
      {
            if (this.Parent != null)
                 Parent.OnClick(e);
            base.OnClick(e);
      }
}

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Tom KnowltonWeb developerAuthor Commented:
And what coordinates will be passed through to the Parent?  Will it be the relative coordinates of the child, or the coordinates of the Parent?
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Jaime OlivaresSoftware ArchitectCommented:
hmm, them will be relative to the child picture box, but you can convert with an ugly trick:

notice the onclick method doesn't pass the mouse cursor coordinates. Use the OnMouseClick instead, with some conversion tricks:
 
protected virtual void OnMouseClick (MouseEventArgs e)
{
     base.OnMouseClick(e);
     if (this.Parent != null)
     {
           e.Location = Parent.PointToClient(this.PointToScreen(e.Location));
           Parent.MouseOnClick(e);
     }
}

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Tom KnowltonWeb developerAuthor Commented:
can you please paste in code that shows how this works with a derived picturebox?
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Jaime OlivaresSoftware ArchitectCommented:
create your derived class as shown above. The control will appear on the toolbox when designing your form, use it instead of PictureBox.
In your form, handle the Click event, it will be fired every time the picture box is clicked.


public class MappedPictureBox : PictureBox
{
    protected virtual void OnMouseClick (MouseEventArgs e)
    {
       base.OnMouseClick(e);
       if (this.Parent != null)
       {
           e.Location = Parent.PointToClient(this.PointToScreen(e.Location));
           Parent.MouseOnClick(e);
       }
    }
}

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Tom KnowltonWeb developerAuthor Commented:
which kind of "new item" do I pick from "Add New Item"?

That is part of my confusion is - how / where do I create this derived control such that it will appear on the Toolbox?
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Jaime OlivaresSoftware ArchitectCommented:
if you create the class and include it in your project, just like other .cs file. The control will automatically appear in the toolbox.
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Tom KnowltonWeb developerAuthor Commented:
I still don't see it in the Toolbox, sorry.
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Jaime OlivaresSoftware ArchitectCommented:
Hmm, there are many things to consider. First you have to compile to allow the control appear in your toolbox. But the code won't compile as is, you will need to derive  the main picture box to allow the code to work, but you can reuse it this way:

namespace System.Windows.Forms
{
    public class MappedPictureBox : PictureBox
    {
        protected override void OnMouseClick(MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnMouseClick(e);
            if (this.Parent != null && this.Parent is MappedPictureBox)
            {
                Point p = Parent.PointToClient(this.PointToScreen(e.Location));
                MouseEventArgs mea = new MouseEventArgs(e.Button, e.Clicks, p.X, p.Y, e.Delta);
                ((MappedPictureBox)Parent).OnMouseClick(mea);  // perform the click
            }
        }
    }
}

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