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Adding a SCSI disk

Posted on 2007-12-02
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Hi,

Anyone can show me a step-by-step procedure to add a new SCSI disk into a Sun Solaris system?

So, imagine a working Sun Solaris system and I bought a new SCSI disk (from Sun).

I put the disk inside.

Now what?

Please describe the steps in much detail.

The disk should be mounted in /backup

The goal is to use the disk and write a small text file in it.

Thanks
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Question by:kapot
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4 Comments
 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 20394099
after install the hard drive, power on the box to OBP promp
( <Stop> A, to get to OBP), type in:
probe-scsi
to make sure the box can see the new hard disk, then perform a reconfigure boot, by typing in:
boot -rv
when the system fully boot up, login as root (or login as a user then su as root), then:

 1. run format -> partition the new disk
  2. creat a new file systems on the hard disk :
            eg:
             newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s7
  3. create the mount point for the hard disk:
     mkdir /backup
  4. edit /etc/vfstab
     /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s7       /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s7     /backup ufs     2       yes     -
5. mount the hard disk:
    mount /backup

    Note: please replace c0t1d0s7 with your real disk partion name.
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Author Comment

by:kapot
ID: 20394331
Hi yuzh,

How did you get the "s7" from the /c0t1d0s7   ?

When I run format, it displays only something like /c0t1d0

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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:omarfarid
ID: 20394361
Hi,

The device name foe the disk is c0t1d0 (controller 0 target 1 disk 0).

Each disk can have up to 8 partitions / slices from 0 to 7.

When you want to refer to partition 7 / slice 7 device name to create a file system / mount it then you use c0t1d0s7
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LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
Hanno P.S. earned 250 total points
ID: 20409701
Use format this way:
a) Define disk type
    - run "format" -> select disk (assume it to be 1 or higher)
    - choose "type" and use "auto" if available, otherwise a matching type
b) Partition the disk for usage
    - still in format select "partition"
    - Change partitions (start, sizes etc.) as you like. Partition 2 is always,
       the whole disk and should not be changed.
    - When done, save the partiton table with "label" command in format
c) Exit format by entering "quit" twice or simply pressing "^D".
btw: Entering "h" or "?" always display the menu of choices in format.
   
d) Now, you are ready to place file systems on any of the partitions you
    created above, using the "newfs" command.
e) Newly created filesystems can be mounted using "mount":
     # mkdir /my/fs1 /my/fs2
     # mount /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s5 /my/fs1
     # mount /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s6 /my/fs2
f)  To make these mounts permanent (to have it mounted automatically
    when your syste boots), they must be entered into /etc/vfstab:
     /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s5 /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s5    /my/fs1  ufs     2       yes     -
     /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s6 /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s6    /my/fs2  ufs     2       yes     -
    If you are not familiar with "vi", you can add these two lines kile this:
     # echo "/dev/dsk/c0t1d0s5 /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s5   /my/fs1  ufs   2   yes   -" >> /etc/vfstab
     # echo "/dev/dsk/c0t1d0s6 /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s6   /my/fs2  ufs   2   yes   -" >> /etc/vfstab
   You may want to make a backup copy before applying these modifcations:
     # cp /etc/vfstab /etc/vfstab.SAVE

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