Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Unidentified traffic on ADSL

Posted on 2007-12-03
7
Medium Priority
?
415 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I lately noted that a LED on my ADSL modem blinked every few seconds eventhough all apps that normally access the Internet (IE, Outlook Express, etc) were off. I checked the traffic with Wireshark and here what it sniffed (this is only a snippet -- the sequence "Echo Request , Echo Reply goes on for ever).
What it this? What causes it and how can I stop it (wasn't there before)?

No.     Time        Source                Destination           Protocol Info
      1 0.000000    Receive_22            Receive_22            PPP LCP  Echo Request

Frame 1 (26 bytes on wire, 26 bytes captured)
Ethernet II, Src: Receive_22 (20:52:45:43:56:22), Dst: Receive_22 (20:52:45:43:56:22)
PPP Link Control Protocol

No.     Time        Source                Destination           Protocol Info
      2 0.000000    Send_22               Send_22               PPP LCP  Echo Reply

Frame 2 (26 bytes on wire, 26 bytes captured)
Ethernet II, Src: Send_22 (20:53:45:4e:44:22), Dst: Send_22 (20:53:45:4e:44:22)
PPP Link Control Protocol

No.     Time        Source                Destination           Protocol Info
      3 10.240234   Receive_22            Receive_22            PPP LCP  Echo Request

Frame 3 (26 bytes on wire, 26 bytes captured)
Ethernet II, Src: Receive_22 (20:52:45:43:56:22), Dst: Receive_22 (20:52:45:43:56:22)
PPP Link Control Protocol

No.     Time        Source                Destination           Protocol Info
      4 10.240234   Send_22               Send_22               PPP LCP  Echo Reply

Open in new window

0
Comment
Question by:Emanuel053197
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
7 Comments
 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:Robert Sutton Jr
ID: 20397176
PPP LCP  Echo Request is a standard echo request coming from your service provider going to your adsl modem.  Did you recently change service providers or has your service provider recently changed its standard for method of delivery?



Definition:
 PPP LCP  Echo Request:
LCP: PPP Link Control Protocol

The Link Control Protocol (LCP) is used to automatically agree upon the encapsulation format options, handle varying limits on sizes of packets, detect a looped-back link and other common misconfiguration errors, and terminate the link. Other optional facilities provided are authentication of the identity of its peer on the link, and determination when a link is functioning properly and when it is failing. The Link Control Protocol LCP in PPP is versatile and portable to a wide variety of environment.

There are three classes of LCP packets:

1.Link Configuration packets used to establish and configure a link (Configure-Request, Configure-Ack, Configure-Nak and Configure-Reject).

2. Link Termination packets used to terminate a link (Terminate-Request and Terminate-Ack).

3. Link Maintenance packets used to manage and debug a link (Code-Reject, Protocol-Reject, Echo-Request, Echo-Reply, and Discard-Request).

In the interest of simplicity, there is no version field in the LCP packet. A correctly functioning LCP implementation will always respond to unknown Protocols and Codes with an easily recognizable LCP packet, thus providing a deterministic fallback mechanism for implementations of other versions.

Regardless of which Configuration Options are enabled, all LCP Link Configuration, Link Termination, and Code-Reject packets (codes 1 through 7) are always sent as if no Configuration Options were negotiated. In particular, each Configuration Option specifies a default value. This ensures that such LCP packets are always recognizable, even when one end of the link mistakenly believes the link to be open.

Exactly one LCP packet is encapsulated in the PPP Information field, where the PPP Protocol field indicates type hex c021 (Link Control Protocol).

Protocol Structure - LCP: PPP Link Control Protocol
IE:
Code :8  Identifier: 16   Length: 32bit   Data: variable
 
Code - Decimal value which indicates the type of LCP packet:
1- Configure-Request.
2- Configure-Ack.
3- Configure-Nak.
4- Configure-Reject.
5- Terminate-Request.
6- Terminate-Ack.
7- Code-Reject.
8- Protocol-Reject.
9- Echo-Request.
10- Echo-Reply.
11- Discard-Request.
12- Link-Quality Report.
 
Identifier - Decimal value which aids in matching requests and replies.
Length - Length of the LCP packet, including the Code, Identifier, Length and Data fields.
Data - Variable length field which may contain one or more configuration options.

Hope this helps you understand a bit more....
   
0
 
LVL 57

Expert Comment

by:giltjr
ID: 20400615
This is perfectly normal.  By default a LCP echo request is done every 10 seconds.  This insures that the link is active.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Emanuel053197
ID: 20401146
To giltjr:
Shouldn't the source and destination addresses be different? For example see Frame 1 in which Src: Receive_22 (20:52:45:43:56:22), Dst: Receive_22 (20:52:45:43:56:22).
0
Q2 2017 - Latest Malware & Internet Attacks

WatchGuard’s Threat Lab is a group of dedicated threat researchers committed to helping you stay ahead of the bad guys by providing in-depth analysis of the top security threats to your network.  Check out our latest Quarterly Internet Security Report!

 

Author Comment

by:Emanuel053197
ID: 20402101
To giltjr:

OK for Echo Request / Reply every 10 seconds but is the other traffic, such as this:

No.     Time        Source                Destination           Protocol Info
     84 382.032226  217.132.137.220       217.132.66.71         TCP      39138 > microsoft-ds [SYN] Seq=0 Len=0 MSS=1360 WS=2

or this:
No.     Time        Source                Destination           Protocol Info
    116 496.948242  217.132.245.39        217.132.66.71         TCP      2298 > epmap [SYN] Seq=0 Len=0 MSS=1460 WS=2
0
 
LVL 57

Accepted Solution

by:
giltjr earned 1000 total points
ID: 20402735
The two packets in your last post are two other computers on the Internet that are attempting to connect to your computer via the Internet.

As for your other question on the addresses being different, no.  PPP is a point to point protocol, so each end does not have a unique "MAC" layer address like Ethernet does.
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:dragonjim
ID: 20412505
Traffic from other computers; looks like different computers on your ISP's network -- if you have a router & firewall software running, unless you're getting hits on the same IP - its probably nothing to worry about. On occassion packets do crop up like this.

If you see the same source IP - you can always forward logs to the ISP, but I doubt its a willful attempt to break into your computer.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Emanuel053197
ID: 31412383
Thanks.
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Why do some people recommend buying business VoIP from an ISP? What are the benefits to my company? What are the costs?
This article will show how Aten was able to supply easy management and control for Artear's video walls and wide range display configurations of their newsroom.
This course is ideal for IT System Administrators working with VMware vSphere and its associated products in their company infrastructure. This course teaches you how to install and maintain this virtualization technology to store data, prevent vuln…
Have you created a query with information for a calendar? ... and then, abra-cadabra, the calendar is done?! I am going to show you how to make that happen. Visualize your data!  ... really see it To use the code to create a calendar from a q…
Suggested Courses

604 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question