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accessing a machine in different subnet

Posted on 2007-12-03
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Last Modified: 2010-04-07
we have a network with IPs 10.1.x.x, we have a computer with IP 192.168.x.x
I can remote to the computer with IP 192.168.x.x, but from there I can not use UNC path back to my computer.
There is a folder in the computer with IP 192.168.x.x that I need to copy back to my computer that is in the range of IP 10.x.x
any Idea on how to do that? and any idea how this is configured so that we can remote to a machine without being able to get back from that machine?

thanks
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Question by:jskfan
8 Comments
 
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by:SteveH_UK
SteveH_UK earned 30 total points
ID: 20398902
What tool are you using to "remote", if it is a Windows XP/2000/2003/Vista machine then you can use remote desktop to also map drives.  If it is a Linux machine, then you can use SSH (with SCP) to copy files.

If you are having problems more generally, you may need to configure static routes on your equipment, and configure your router, because routers will not normally route between private subnets which these are.  You also may have issues with broadcasts for the same reason, and this may be affecting you.
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by:static-void
static-void earned 40 total points
ID: 20398906
theres two ways you can go about this, either at a router level add an extra interface so that you have an interface on each of your subnets then create routing rules so packets from the other subnet are routed through the router to where you want. The other option is to creat aliases on your network cards for your clients so they have an address on both networks. Ild recommend doing this the 1st way as its much more tidy.
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by:lcit
lcit earned 30 total points
ID: 20398933
Can the IP of the 192.168.x.x computer not be changed?  if not, you could try adding a static route to that computer's routing table back to yours on the 10 network.  A sure bet would be router on a stick:
http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/473/50.shtml#conf

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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 20399051
static-void:

<<<The other option is to creat aliases on your network cards for your clients so they have an address on both networks. Ild recommend doing this the 1st way as its much more tidy.>>>>
can you detail this in step by step?

thanks
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Expert Comment

by:static-void
ID: 20399076
what os? xp?
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by:static-void
ID: 20399136
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by:
Rob Williams earned 400 total points
ID: 20399540
I assume if you can remote to the 192.x.x.x machine that it is not a routing issue, but rather a name resolution or firewall issue. Can you connect back to the 10.x.x.x network using the IP such as:
\\10.x.x.x\ShareName\FileName
If not it may be that there is a software firewall enabled on the 10.x.x.x machine blocking incoming connections, specifically file and print sharing.

I am assuming these are on an internal network and not connected by the Internet or a VPN client configuration.
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Expert Comment

by:Rob Williams
ID: 20589259
Thanks jskfan.
Cheers !
--Rob
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