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C stucture copy

Posted on 2007-12-03
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Last Modified: 2010-04-15
Struct {
             int a ;
            int b[100] ;
           char c[10 ];
       }   A , B ;

 A =B   ;

Question : A = B will copy all fields correctly ?
                 
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Question by:karana
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ravenpl earned 100 total points
ID: 20401483
Why will not You check that? But yes - as long there's no pointers it will copy it fine.
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by:ravenpl
ID: 20401485
In other words it works like following
memcpy((void*)&A, (void*)&B, sizeof(B));
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by:ozo
ID: 20401507
probably.
although the memcpy would also copy anything in any padding between fields, whereas the assignment is not guaranteed to do that.
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by:ravenpl
ID: 20401517
gnu gcc in optimized code does memcpy.
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by:ozo
ID: 20401538
It's the simplest implementation, so I would expect most compilers to do it that way.
But there is no requirement that it be implemented that way.
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by:ravenpl
ID: 20401544
True - anyway the answer "Yes" stands here.
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by:ozo
ozo earned 25 total points
ID: 20401563
Agreed.  A = B will copy all fields correctly.
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by:ozo
ID: 20401595
Sorry, ravenpl, I see you made the  "works like" comment, which I now think you meant to be in terms of answering the question.
I had thought initially that it was said by the asker of the question as an inference from your answer.  In which case I wanted to clarify that the inference may not precisely follow.
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by:itsmeandnobodyelse
ID: 20401804
>>>> But yes - as long there's no pointers it will copy it fine.

It also copies pointers correctly.

The issue with pointers is differently. It normally is no good idea to have the same pointer 'value' stored in more than one struct cause only one of these structs can be responsible for freeing the memory. So, in case you have

typedef struct tagA
{
     char * fname;
     char * lname;
} A;

     ...
     A a, b;
     a.fname = (char*)malloc(50);
     strcpy(a.fname, "John");
     a.lname = (char*)malloc(50);
     strcpy(a.lname, "Smith");
     b = a;

     ...
     free(a.fname);
     free(a.lname);
     ...
     printf("%s %s", b.fname, b.lname);

would print data that were already freed in memory and may contain rubbish because of that. And of course

     free(b.fname);
     free(b.lname);

would crash. To get out of that you always would need to allocate new memory to pointers after assignment:

     b = a;
     b.fname = (char*)malloc(50);
     strcpy(b.fname, a.fname);
     b.lname = (char*)malloc(50);
     strcpy(b.lname, a.lname);

what of course makes the assignment worthless in that sample.

Regards, Alex


   



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by:ravenpl
ID: 20401836
Well, yes pointers are copied, but data pointed by pointer is not. That what I  meant. If You have pointers in structure, it's somehow unsafe, and You may think You should free data pointed by those pointers twice. But it's untrue - and unclear which copy should free the pointed data.
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