Solved

Automatically Entering a Parameter Value In Access

Posted on 2007-12-04
5
1,915 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-27
I have a query that when you run it you get an Enter Parameter Value window.  I want to run this query along with several others in a macro and I don't want to have to enter this value every time I run the macro.  Is  there a way to automatically populate the value as the macro runs the queries?  Please advise and thank you very much.

Steve
0
Comment
Question by:submarinerssbn731
5 Comments
 
LVL 77

Expert Comment

by:peter57r
ID: 20404058
If you are always going to use the same value then chnage the query to use that value instead of using a parameter field.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:LouieGee
ID: 20404310
There are some things to note:
1) The use of the "PARAMETERS" keyword in the query itself
2) You can get a count of a query's parameter's by referencing the parameters.count property
3) You can refer to a query's parameters as a collection(by name) or index(by number)

Public Sub PQry()
Dim DB As Database
Dim Q As QueryDef
Dim I%
Set DB = CurrentDb
Set Q = DB.QueryDefs("pquery")
Debug.Print Q.Parameters.Count

For I = 0 To Q.Parameters.Count - 1
Debug.Print Q.Parameters(I).Name, "'"; Q.Parameters(I).Value; "'"
Q.Parameters(I).Value = "10101"
Debug.Print Q.Parameters(I).Name, "'"; Q.Parameters(I).Value; "'"

Next
End Sub




The code snippet below was taken from the Access 97 help file on PARAMETERS:


This example requires the user to provide a job title and then uses that job title as the criteria for the query.

This example calls the EnumFields procedure, which you can find in the SELECT statement example.
 

Sub ParametersX()
 

	Dim dbs As Database, qdf As QueryDef

	Dim rst As Recordset

	Dim strSql As String, strParm As String

	Dim strMessage As String

	Dim intCommand As Integer

	

	' Modify this line to include the path to Northwind

	' on your computer.

	Set dbs = OpenDatabase("NorthWind.mdb")

	

	' Define the parameters clause.

	strParm = "PARAMETERS [Employee Title] TEXT; "
 

	' Define an SQL statement with the parameters

	' clause.

	strSql = strParm & "SELECT LastName, FirstName, " _
 

& "EmployeeID " _

		& "FROM Employees " _

		& "WHERE Title =[Employee Title];"

	

	' Create a QueryDef object based on the 

	' SQL statement.

	Set qdf = dbs.CreateQueryDef _

		("Find Employees", strSql)

	

	Do While True

		strMessage = "Find Employees by Job " _

			& "title:" & Chr(13) _

			& "  Choose Job Title:" & Chr(13) _

			& "   1 - Sales Manager" & Chr(13) _

			& "   2 - Sales Representative" & Chr(13) _

			& "   3 - Inside Sales Coordinator"
 

intCommand = Val(InputBox(strMessage))

		

		Select Case intCommand

			Case 1

				qdf("Employee Title") = _

					"Sales Manager"

			Case 2

				qdf("Employee Title") = _

					"Sales Representative"

			Case 3

				qdf("Employee Title") = _

					"Inside Sales Coordinator"

			Case Else

				Exit Do

		End Select

		

		' Create a temporary snapshot-type Recordset.

		Set rst = qdf.OpenRecordset(dbOpenSnapshot)
 

' Populate the Recordset.

		rst.MoveLast

			

	' Call EnumFields to print the contents of the 

	' Recordset. Pass the Recordset object and desired

	' field width.

		EnumFields rst, 12

	Loop

	

	' Delete the QueryDef because this is a

	' demonstration.

	dbs.QueryDefs.Delete "Find Employees"

	

	dbs.Close
 

End Sub

Open in new window

0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
LouieGee earned 50 total points
ID: 20404619
Oops, you said macro not VB, I spoke too soon

You could create a form with a text box and have the query reference that text box.
The text box can be bound to a table if you want to keep the same criteria for a while (days, weeks, months)
 or the text box can be unbound if you want the criteria to only be stored for the limited time that the form is open.

You would create a form with a text box on it and name the text box something appropriate like maybe "Text0"
In your parameter query, put a reference to that form's text box instead of the parameter.
That would look something like this: [forms]![formname]![text0]
Whenever you ran the query it would look for the textbox on the form and filter your query with that.
You could use multiple text boxes to filter multiple fields if you wanted.
This works well if you have multiple queries that filter on the same criteria.
A little complicated but, this will work.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:submarinerssbn731
ID: 31412608
This worked.  Thanks!
0
 

Expert Comment

by:detmers
ID: 26010383
I had this same need... I wanted to run 4 queries, each with the same parameter.  I ended up doing the following:

1.  Created a form to get the parameter
- I named the form SelectForm
- in my case, I wanted to select a field from an existing table, so I used a combo box that selected the field I wanted to pass.
- I named the field SelectParameter

2.  Modified the queries I ran to accept the value from the form I just created.
- in criteria for each query, I put =[Forms]![SelectForm]![SelectParameter]

3.  On the SelectForm form I created, I put a command button to run each of the queries.

4.  I can now run the form, select the value I want, and it runs all 4 queries.  You can add some fancier stuff to turn off the messages and look for errors, but I was happy just to get this far.
0

Featured Post

Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

When you are entering numbers in a speadsheet, and don't remember what 6×7 is, you just type “=6*7" instead. It works in every cell! This is not so in Access. To enter the elusive 42 in a text box, you have to find a calculator, and then copy the re…
Describes a method of obtaining an object variable to an already running instance of Microsoft Access so that it can be controlled via automation.
In Microsoft Access, learn different ways of passing a string value within a string argument. Also learn what a “Type Mis-match” error is about.
With Microsoft Access, learn how to start a database in different ways and produce different start-up actions allowing you to use a single database to perform multiple tasks. Specify a start-up form through options: Specify an Autoexec macro: Us…

895 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

18 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now