Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 976
  • Last Modified:

Intel Matrix Raid possible configurations

Everywhere I find some document concerning Intel Matrix Raid is stated that I can
- having 2 drives create 2 arrays/volumes (raid1 + raid0)
- having more than 2 drives create two arrays/volumes(raid1 + raid5)

But what I want
Having 4 drives create 5 volumes, first is raid1 build from parts of first two(or more) drives
then remaining space from every hdd as single volume.
Can I?
0
ravenpl
Asked:
ravenpl
  • 2
  • 2
1 Solution
 
RockChalkCommented:
[snip] having 2 drives create 2 arrays/volumes (raid1 + raid0) [/snip]
The nomenclature that Intel uses is that you have one array (collection of disks) and you create two volumes on that single array (given this terminology, volumes exist on arrays).  Yes, you can create an array with two disks, and put a RAID0 volume and a RAID1 volume on that array.

[snip] having more than 2 drives create two arrays/volumes(raid1 + raid5) [/snip]
This is not a possible configuration.  RAID1 can only be created on an array with 2 disks.  RAID5 can only be created on an array with 3+ disks.  Hence, you cannot have a RAID1 and a RAID5 volume on the same array.  You could have a RAID5 and a RAID0 on the same array.  You could even create two separate RAID5 volumes on the same array (though I don't see where that would be desirable).

[snip]
Having 4 drives create 5 volumes, first is raid1 build from parts of first two(or more) drives
then remaining space from every hdd as single volume.
Can I?
[/snip]
No, with Intel's RAID solution, there is no way to get the "extra" disk space that's not being used for RAID.  

However, if the two disks that you want to use RAID1 on are about the same size, you could create a RAID1 volume using, say, 50% of the space on the disks.  Then you could create a RAID0 using the remaining space.  From a storage space perspective, the only space that you lose is the difference in size between the two disks.  As long as they're about the same size, that won't be much.
0
 
ravenplAuthor Commented:
I need small raid1 and large separate drives. I don't want make them one big raid0, cause single spindle failure causes all data lost.
I suppose it's impossible with matrix raid - right?
0
 
RockChalkCommented:
Matrix Raid can't do exactly what you're asking, but it does get you a lot closer than most RAID solutions.  I don't know what disk sizes you have, so I'm going to assume they're the following hypothetical values:
Disk A: 100GB
Disk B: 120 GB
Disks C,D: 500GB

You can create a Matrix Array using A and B.  You then create a 20GB RAID1 volume on that array, and a 160GB RAID0 volume on the same array.

Disks C and D are just used as stand-alone disks.

Obviously, if you have a single disk failure on A or B, you will lose all the data on the RAID0, and none of the data on the RAID1. You also "lose" 20GB of potential storage space on B. (since it's 20GB bigger than A).

You realize performance gains on reads with the RAID0 and RAID1.  You only realize performance gains on writes on the RAID0.

Hopefully this helps.
0
 
ravenplAuthor Commented:
OK ,thanx.
0

Featured Post

What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now