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Complete Migration

Posted on 2007-12-05
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Last Modified: 2010-03-05
Hello,

I need help to complete my Windows Migration from Server 2000 to 2003. To be upfront, Ive never done anything like this so I am unsure of alot. Previously, the only DC on the network was the 2000 machine. Now I wish to phase out the old server; the new 2003 machine is on the network as a DC with dns, dhcp, global catalog, etc. Still have to move FSMO roles. I would like to also make sure email works once I phase out the old machine-so any help with how to switch over Exchange would be great. Also once I have all the server roles switched over; or before if possible, I need to know how to move all the files from the old server to the new one. I will install old applications on the new machine as needed, but can I retain all of the old shares and files in original form?

I was told briefly about xcopy, but not sure exactly how to use it. What else could I use? I need some step by step guidence of what to do on this manner if possible. Thanks for any help
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Question by:TVanLanen
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michko earned 167 total points
ID: 20414869
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by:TVanLanen
ID: 20420736
thanks, I scanned a few of the links and there are one or two I havent run into yet. However, I am looking for a more complete guide to moving everything to my new domain controller. I was also wondering in regards to exchange.. if I have a provider as my POP3 external email server such as Mercury.net...what do I need to do in regards to email for the migration. I do have the internal email and a mapped drive for exchange. These are things I'm not sure how to transfer and keep intact.
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by:JjcampNR
JjcampNR earned 333 total points
ID: 20482960
OK, here's the basic outline...

Build the new server and add it to the domain, run dcpromo on it to make it a domain controller.  Once everything finishes you'll need to move the FSMO roles from the old DC to the new one.  I'd HIGHLY suggest that you either keep the old DC in the domain as a second domain controller or that after you remove it you add another 2003 domain controller (you could rebuild the 2000 machine with 2003 and follow the same steps as you just did with the new DC but not transfer the FSMO roles).

Keep in mind that if you have only one domain controller in your network and it happens to crash and you can't recover it, your ENTIRE domain (yes, including Exchange) will need to be rebuilt and all of the clients will need to be joined to the new domain.  With a second DC you can avoid this major problem - even if it's an old machine just sitting there mostly idle there could come a time when that server will save your company's domain (and likely your job).

Here are the links that should walk you through everything:
Adding a new DC - Go about half way down to the "configuring Windows 2003 as a domain controller":  http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/technologies/directory/activedirectory/stepbystep/domcntrl.mspx

Transferring FSMO Roles:
Microsoft KB Article:  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324801
Additional Info:  http://www.petri.co.il/transferring_fsmo_roles.htm

Demoting A Domain Controller (should you decide you're willing to chance having only one DC or you want to rebuild the 2000 DC to a 2003 DC):
http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/f82e0fb0-552f-4b94-9ece-f550388976571033.mspx?mfr=true

Exchange Migration:  http://www.amset.info/exchange/migration.asp

Does this all make sense to you?  Any other questions?
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by:JjcampNR
JjcampNR earned 333 total points
ID: 20482972
Sorry, mised the files part....

Use the free Robocopy utility provided by Microsoft.  This will copy all data, file structures, NTFS permissions, and all other file info (timestamps, ownership info, auditing info, etc) over to the new sever.  Robocopy can be easily scripted but if you need help let me know.

The only thing that robocopy won't copy over are the share permissions.  My suggestion is to create the same shares, with the same permissions, on the new server first.  After you verify they're configured correctly, copy the data over and then unshare the folders on the old server (leave the data until your users give you the OK on the new shares and copied data).
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by:JjcampNR
ID: 20482983
And again, I missed something....
Robocopy is part of the resource kit, which you can get for 2003 server here:  
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=9D467A69-57FF-4AE7-96EE-B18C4790CFFD&displaylang=en

There's  even a GUI you can get here:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/technetmag/issues/2006/11/UtilitySpotlight/
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by:JjcampNR
ID: 20579620
Honestly, I think that if experts have provided useful information and the Asker doesn't return to the question, the points should be split between those who have spent time and attempted to help.  Deleting the question without refund does punish the Asker for abandoning the question (and rightly so) but it doesn't offer any sort of reward for those who have spent their own time (for free I might add) and attempted to someone with a problem.  It's extremely frustrating as an expert to spend my time putting together a helpful, thought out response only to see the question closed/deleted with no points given to anyone who did respond.

So, my suggestion would be to split points between all experts who have provided useful information that could be part of a valid solution and close the question.
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by:JjcampNR
ID: 20590108
OK, thanks.
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by:michko
ID: 20598923
TVanLanen - your request to close the question states that you found your own solution.   Could you be so kind as to post it here for reference purposes.  As I stated, I am still in the gathering information stage on an upgrade so would really like to see what proved the most helpful to you.

So none of the suggestions, by either myself or JjcampNR answered your question, or pointed you in the right direction?  I personally thought the information provided by JjcampNR was extremely detailed and helpful.

michko
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by:JjcampNR
ID: 20646352
Please proceed with actions mentioned above.
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by:michko
ID: 20652644
No objection to split.
michko
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by:Lunchy
ID: 20692439
Force accepted.
Lunchy
Friendly Neighbourhood Community Support Moderator
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Author Comment

by:TVanLanen
ID: 20710294
Hey guys sorry about any confusion, but I did select a solution and an assisted one.  The solution I selected was michko's first post.  The one with all the links is the one I selected as a solution because it gave me the most direction and what I was looking for was some guidence and direction.  I also accepted JjcampNRDate:12.16.2007 at 10:42PM CSTAssisted Solution because it aided in my question.  Not sure whats up at this point but I would just like this to be closed if possible so we can all move on.
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