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GPO Help - Need Help Locating and Changing A Custom Setting.

Hey everyone,

I've got a GPO that was made with Server 2000 and possibly created on XP SP1.  Now I've been given the task of changing it some what, but I can't tweak one of the settings.

We are looking to remove only the "C" drive from the user's "My Computer" on the network's workstations.

Inside of GPMC, I open the GPO and hit the Settings Tab...at the bottom of that tab I see:

Extra Registry Settings
     Display names for some settings cannot be found. You might be able to resolve this issue by updating the .ADM files used by Group Policy Management.

Setting                                                                                                              State
Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer\NoDrives         31

I think this is what I need to alter to allow all drive except the "C" drive.

Does anyone know how I might revert that back or view it so its NOT and "Extra Registry Setting?"

1 Solution
Farhan KaziSystems EngineerCommented:
Have a look at following link:

Hope this helps!
inverted_2000Author Commented:
Kind of helps...but there are 70 folders under

I see the system.adm file, but which one should I access the system.adm from?
Can you use the GPOE and follow these steps:

1. Start the Microsoft Management Console. On the Console menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in.
2. Add the Group Policy Object Editor snap-in for the default domain policy. To do this, click Browse when you are prompted to select a Group Policy Object (GPO). The default GPO is Local Computer. You can also add GPOs for other domain partitions (specifically, Organizational Units).
3. Open the following sections: User Configuration, Administrative Templates, Windows Components, and Windows Explorer.
4. Click Hide these specified drives in My Computer.
5. Click to select the Hide these specified drives in My Computer check box.
6. Click the appropriate option in the drop-down box.

This will edit the proper .adm file
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inverted_2000Author Commented:
I got that much...I'm going to try to set them all back as Disabled and see if I can get them back to the default.
inverted_2000Author Commented:
Yup...I just changed the settings around...from:

Not Configured

That seemed to re-write whatever had that option 31 in place.

Thanks anyway folks (o:
The guy who did this probably did what Microsoft recommends *not* to do: he edited the %Systemroot%\inf\system.adm file on his machine, created the GPO, and the customized adm got updated by a service pack.
Make a backup of the GPO using the GPMC before you start with the following.
Use the GPMC to find the GPO's GUID; in the policies folder, check the subfolder named with this GUID for the subfolder "Adm". In the adm folder, open system.adm in Notepad, and search for "!!ABOnly" (can appear several times); check if you see the "31" (which hides A through E) as VALUE NUMERIC in this policy block.
If so, copy that system.adm to your workstation, rename it to system-temp.adm or whatever. Start the GP editor, unload system.adm (right-click "User Configuration\Administrative Templates"), load your system-temp.adm instead. You should now be able to set the "Hide Drives" policy back to "Not configured" (don't change anything else). Close the GP editor, open it again. Remove the system-temp.adm file, add the original system.adm, and you should now be able to set the "Hide Drives" value to your likings.
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