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How do I convert my existing cable internet connection into wireless?

Posted on 2007-12-06
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I have a cable internet connection which is directly connected to my desktop running Windows Xp Professional without any router or modem. It runs 24 hours and speed is also decent to browse around but downloading is very low. What I want to do is, I want to turn this Cable connection wireless to use my Sony Vaio laptop (running Windows XP MCE ) with it. I don't have a wireless adaptor for my desktop. I just want my desktop to run from Lan card and laptop wirelessly. I don't want to buy a wireless adaptor for my desktop as its fine, connected through lan card. just want to use my laptop wirelessly with the same connection. Is there any possible way to do it. I have searched all over the net but the information i get is for DSL or Broadband connections. Can someone suggest anything possible. Thankyou
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Question by:DeadManWalking
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by:martonejd
martonejd earned 20 total points
ID: 20421744
First you need to purchase a wireless router, such as a Linksys.
http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satellite?c=L_Product_C2&childpagename=US%2FLayout&cid=1175233984378&pagename=Linksys%2FCommon%2FVisitorWrapper&lid=8437839789B01
Your cable connection will connect to the router, which will also act as a firewall.  The wireless router should also have LAN ports, so you can connect the PC also.  Then you need to purchase a wireless LAN card for your laptop, unless it already has an internal wireless card.  
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20421896
You mean to say that my direct internet line will connect to the router and then from the router I will extend one connection to my desktop via ethernet. So I want to know will my static IP needs some changes or they will remain the same as they were before connecting thru router. As my network administrator has assigned static ip addresses to the system connected to its network.

Thank you very much
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by:martonejd
ID: 20421928
if this is a home cable line, the most likely the cable company uses DHCP, so you may get a different internet IP address each time you disconnect the line.  but the router will get that address.  then on the router you configure NAT (network address translation) which assigns your LAN with internal IP addresses, not seen on the internet.  the router can also use DHCP to give IP addresses to the PC and laptop.
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by:dragonjim
dragonjim earned 20 total points
ID: 20422201
Deadman -- your ISP side IP will depend on the ISP's policy and what you pay for. For a DHCP environment, connecting a new router will give a new IP as the UBR will see the customer side equipment as a new MAC address, and issue an IP.

If you pay for a static IP for gaming or other uses - you will maintain that address (configured in the wireless router WAN setup). Then determine your LAN configuration (DHCP / STatic).

Each is independent of the other through the NAT feature - the ISP will only "see" your router's IP address.

But I agree with martonejd -- unless you where told otherwise... residential is likely DHCP. You may well be in violation of account guidelines by static addressing the router's WAN side. (Cable won't persay see this until someone complains you knocked them off or they can't connect)...
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20426789
I understand that, we as customers don't have direct contact with the ISP. We have Network administrators who pass out connections to our homes and we only deal with them, so I don't think there will be any violation of account guidelines.

My desktop pc is set to aquire IP Adress automatically from TCP/IP option. whenever i want to use the same internet connection thru my Laptop. Ip address changes, its not a problem for me as far as Internet is working.

I just want to know that if I go n buy a router and connect my direct cable connection to it and extend a lan to my desktop and use my laptop wirelessly, will it work without any configuration. If it does work but needs configuration then what is to be done to make run wirelessly. this is my whole point.

Thanks
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20426823
I forgot to mention that we need to install Microsoft firewall Client (ISA) to use the internet or else it doesn't work. How should the router be configured to use the internet connection.
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20426872
I will be buying this router from Linksys:
http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satellite?c=L_Product_C2&childpagename=US%2FLayout&cid=1149562300349&pagename=Linksys%2FCommon%2FVisitorWrapper

Will that work or should I go for the one suggested by -martonejd-.
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by:martonejd
ID: 20427603
Linksys has a tool you can use that will run you through the set up process. before you disconnect anything, run that tool and it will tell you when to connect the router and should run the through the rest of the configuration, ie, setting up dhcp for the lan and the wireless.

http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satellite?c=L_CASupport_C1&childpagename=US%2FLayout&cid=1166859678292&pagename=Linksys%2FCommon%2FVisitorWrapper&lid=7829244332B03
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by:ElrondCT
ID: 20427737
That router (Linksys WRT54G) should work fine; I've used it for a number of clients. I strongly encourage setting up WPA encryption to protect against rogue users of your network. (First set up the router, make sure the wireless connection is working with your laptop without encryption, then set up the same encryption key on both the router and your laptop.)

When you unplug your computer from the cable modem and stick the router into the mix, be sure to turn off the cable modem for 60 seconds to force it to reset. Cable modems typically "lock on" to the device they're serving, and they won't talk to another device until power-cycled.

If the static IP is used for outside computers to connect in to your desktop computer, there will be extra setup involved for the router to pass that connection through to your desktop. However, if all usage is outbound, you'll probably want to set the router to use the computer's current static IP, then set the computer to use a dynamic IP provided by the router. That's not certain, though; like the other responders, I'm surprised that you've got a static IP, and we'd need to understand more what the purpose of that is to give you clear direction on how to apply that to the router environment. It's odd to have a network administrator involved if your cable modem connection is coming from a typical cable company. However, I'm in the U.S., as I think dragonjim is, and your time zone indicates that you're in Pakistan, so we may not understand the way they do things there.
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by:dragonjim
ID: 20428500
Ok, your DHCP on the WAN side... you'll need to know that in the configuration of the router.
The router will likely work out of the box... HOWEVER.

This is likely set to default as a wide-open wifi connection... I would suggest you add encryption, perhaps WPA2 -- in the US - the routers come with excellent general configuration guides.

I'm in the US and agree with ElrondCT - it is highly unusual for cable modem subscribers to have intermediaries between the customer and the cable company.

"My desktop pc is set to aquire IP Adress automatically from TCP/IP option. whenever i want to use the same internet connection thru my Laptop. Ip address changes, its not a problem for me as far as Internet is working."

--> One other question that is highly atypical here in the US (maybe standard and related to the Admin funtion in Pakistan): "I have a cable internet connection which is directly connected to my desktop running Windows Xp Professional without any router or modem."
...... for cable service you NEED a MODEM (router is optional, but modem is not) - can you confirm there is no device which provides a CABLE IN / ETHERNET (USB) OUT.

But the router will have to be configured... WAN is simply DHCP from ISP (admins).

LAN: Decide if you want an open connection or secured (WPA2, WEP, etc). I would recommend securing the signal on the wireless.
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20431701
dragonjim- let me clear it to you.

The network admins (I think) buy bandwiths from an ISP and create a server which then pass out connections to home users. They have placed an Ethernet Hub switch on the roof of my house and sent a cable down to my room, which is connected to my dektop pc through LAN card. I don't need to have a cable modem or anything to use internet, except that LAN / ETHERNET card. Its just like the same way people use internet at an office. All computers connected through ethernet card receive internet connection from a main server situated at someplace.

Hope I have cleared that out.

And yeah I really want a secure connection which only I can use.
One other thing I need to ask is, once I get the wireless connection will it work in other rooms or will it just be limited to my room.
This is the whole story :). Hope it works out and I succeed making my existing connection wireless.

Thanks guys for all your efforts, just waiting for a final and complete answer.
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ElrondCT earned 40 total points
ID: 20433164
I think we were confused by your reference to "cable." I think you're saying that you have a standard network cable (Category 5, rectangular plug, eight wires) that comes from your admin's server elsewhere in the building to your room. We were thinking you had the original ISP's cable (typically a single wire, round plug, which connects to a cable modem).

If I'm describing your situation correctly, then you will set up your router's Internet connection using the static IP address and gateway information now assigned to your computer. The cable coming into your room goes to the WAN port of the router. Your computer will plug into one of the LAN ports of your new router. You should then change your computer to dynamic IP address ("Obtain an IP address automatically" in the TCP/IP Properties of your computer's network card settings).

The wireless signal will probably travel to some additional rooms, though each wall or floor reduces the signal strength. How far it will travel will depend on the thickness and materials of the walls. Again, I strongly urge you to encrypt the signal (WPA/WPA2 is best; WEP is known to be breakable), so that you control who is using the signal. If you don't use encryption, it is absolutely vital that you have a firewall on your computer, as you are otherwise providing an open door for hackers to break into your computer.
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by:pulkit1982
pulkit1982 earned 20 total points
ID: 20433580
Hi,
For the same you need to purchase a wireless access point either linksys or netgear or D-Link.
Confiure the same with the IP address provided to your PC by the Internet provider.
Also you need to ask for a spare IP address from your service provider so that you there is no IP address duplication in the internet Hub.

Else if he fails to provide a spare IP address you can use Wireless router with two ethernet ports. configure  two different IP address in the Ethernet ports. You can also configure DHCP on the router as well. Hence you can connect many laptops to use internet,
Hope this helps.
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20433643
So -pulkit1982- What is the difference between a linksys router and wireless access point. The router I posted earlier, is it good or not. Aren't router suppose to work as an access point either way. Well I have understood pretty much now. Just a last thing. Do I need to configure my desktop PC to setup the router or my laptop to b able to use the wireless connection. Like -martonejd- wrote Linksys has tool which guides through the process of going wireless. Is it run on a pc with which we will use as a wireless or the desktop. This is the last question and I pretty much agree with -ElrondCT-

Thankyou guyz
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by:pulkit1982
ID: 20433659
Deadmanwalking---access point is used when you want to extend your LAN whereas Router separates between two different networks one side WAN and another side LAN. yes Wireless router can act as an access point but the deployment is different.
No you can run setup in any desktop or laptop. The router configuration is very simple, its a GUI based setup accessing the default IP address of the Router.

Thanks...
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20433700
Thanks.. So I should go for an access point rather than a router. is that correct.
thanks. really appreciate the reply I got from everyone of you.
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by:pulkit1982
ID: 20433712
Yes you got it correctly.. In your deployment scenario AP is needed instead of Router.
All the best..
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 31413210
Thanks guys I really appreciate all the answers I got. Keep up the good work and in case I get into any problems while going through all this procedure I will pot again, but everything should go smooth now. Thanks
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by:ElrondCT
ID: 20433774
A wireless access point may not meet your needs. A WAP won't provide multiple IP addresses for multiple computers, and you're only getting a single static IP from your network admin. A WAP will work for you only if the admin will give you an extra IP address for your laptop--which he may charge you for. Also, a router like the WRT54G will give you 4 ports to plug into. A WAP will generally only give you one plug-in port.

The cost difference is pretty small, and the router gives you considerably more flexibility. I think you're better off with a router.
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20441450
hey -ElrondCT, i bought the Linksys WRT54g router. it is working fine, i didn't had any problems connecting it. I'm able to use my connection on both the pc's that is Desktop and laptop. I just want to know how to secure it with a password. or Encrypt it with WPA2. thanks.
If u can answer this, I'll really appreciate it
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by:ElrondCT
ID: 20441971
The router's setup pages are at IP address 192.168.1.1; the default user name is blank, with password "admin". To set WPA2 encryption, go to the Wireless / Wireless Security setup page. Select the WPA2 Personal security mode, AES algorithm. Enter a key code--make this multiple words and numbers combined, something not obvious to anyone else. Click Save Settings. Note that this goes into effect immediately, so your laptop will lose its network connection. (This is described in your user guide under "Wireless > Wireless Security.")

Once it's set for your router, go to your laptop. When you try to reconnect to the wireless network, Windows will tell you that it is encrypted, and ask for the passphrase. Enter the same key code that you entered on the router. You should then be all set.

If this doesn't get you going, you should really ask a separate question, and I or others can provide further assistance.
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by:DeadManWalking
ID: 20442065
Thanks. i really can't this setup page to work. I will be posting a separate question for it.
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by:dragonjim
ID: 20443705
DeadManWalking...

"One other thing I need to ask is, once I get the wireless connection will it work in other rooms or will it just be limited to my room."
--> You should be good around the access point. But the actual answer to range will depend upon where in the house you situate it.

Unless you require the static IP addresses from the admins (yes, I believed we were speaking about a Cable Modem and ISP vs. a dedicated bandwidth line, shared between a building)...  I would consider:

CAT-5 Ethernet cable to your home into a Router (wireless will work fine)
Use the settings provided by your admins for the WAN side (static I take it).
--> On the LAN side, configure a private range of addresses (192.168.0.1 - .255 for example).

This will provide plenty of address space behind the router for computers and devices (network printers, VOIP residential phone, etc).

If you are running any servers accessible via the Internet (web) - you would want to inquire about a 2nd IP address.

I cannot begin to comment on this arrangement in Pakistan, might cost, you might get more than 1 static per your agreement... I simply don't know the conventions.
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