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15 ethernet interfaces, which is Eth0 ? ( in linux )

We have stacked servers and the people that manage them are very very far away.  They need to plug into eth0 and the dell servers run Redhat 4.

Without plugging in all the interfaces, how can we determine which actuall nick ( or quad nic port ) is eth0

I need someone to be able to physicaly point to eth0  

How does linux deside which one is zero ?  
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itguy411
Asked:
itguy411
3 Solutions
 
rindiCommented:
ifconfig eth0 will show you some info on the nic, including it's MAC address. From that you should be able to find out which one it is.
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WizRd-LinuxCommented:
if ifplugd is running on the server and you can call the people that support the box you can be on the phone and plug in 1 interface, they should then be able to tell you by looking at /var/log/messages which interface has been plugged in, if it isn't the correct one move to the next one till they tell you eth0 is plugged in.

It would pay at that stage to create a list / map of the cards and label the interfaces.
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Rance_HallCommented:
Linux assigns the ethX numbers in the order that the nics are detected at startup, this is influenced by two paramaters:

In order of importance:  the order that the network card modules are modprobed into the kernel at startup

a system with three nics might have nic 2 listed as eth0 if its module was the first one loaded, and thus its the first one detected.

If you have more that one nic in the system that takes the same module/driver then the order is the pci port order on the MB

a pci scan starts at pci slot 0 and works it way down the list.

so two identical cards will be numbered in the order that the bus was scanned.

so, combine those two items, and you have the ethX mystery pretty well solved.

so to recap, the order that the driver was loaded into the kernel, and the order of identical cards on the bus.

You can usually manipulate the module loading order by creating a modprobe.conf file, or something similar for your distro (check your docs for sure) and listing the modules in the order you want them loaded.

This can sometimes force eth0 to be the one you want.  (sometimes because the bus order thing you cant change)

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bhnmiCommented:
I have found more often then not (allot more then not), that the port furthest to the right is eth0.
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manuelfluryCommented:
Use lspci to get the information from the PCI bus

The order the module are loaded determine the numbering

Finally type as root :

dmesg to get info from the kernel

You should get your answer :

$ dmesg | grep eth
divert: not allocating divert_blk for non-ethernet device lo
divert: allocating divert_blk for eth0
e1000: eth0: e1000_probe: Intel(R) PRO/1000 Network Connection
divert: allocating divert_blk for eth1
e1000: eth1: e1000_probe: Intel(R) PRO/1000 Network Connection
e1000: eth0: e1000_watchdog_task: NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex
e1000: eth0: e1000_watchdog_task: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO
divert: not allocating divert_blk for non-ethernet device sit0
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Rance_HallCommented:
My first introduction to modules.conf was on a gentoo box.

Iif you change the order that the modules are loaded you get eth0 assigned to different nic.

as far as the furthest to the right, I think thats the MB pci slot order, but different MB makers can put them in another order if they want to.

This is one think that freebsd got right, when a kernel driver detects an ethernet card, the card is not given ethX as a name, its given a name that is related to the driver that is loaded to run the card.

so then you end up with vr0 and xl0 and whatever else.  its still in MB pci port order, but its alot nicer (IMO)







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itguy411Author Commented:
This was one of the best, accurate and total solutions I  have had on EE and I love EE.

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