How to optimize the database design

I am trying to design a new database with trending and event data for devices at different site.

The data may keep coming in.

I am quite new in database design, may I know if there is any golden rules? Thanks
turbot_yuAsked:
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Ramesh SrinivasConnect With a Mentor Technical ConsultantCommented:
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imitchieConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Some rules for convenience:
normalize tables
design fill factors properly
design growth factor for performance
use identity columns on all tables
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turbot_yuAuthor Commented:
May you give detail info of
normalize tables
design fill factors properly
design growth factor for performance
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YveauConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The DB hero on database design is Christopher J. Date.
One of his best books: An Introduction to Database Systems (ISBN 0-321-19784-4)

... that should get you firm in your seat as a db designer ...

Hope this helps ...
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turbot_yuAuthor Commented:
I cannot afford for the book, also I need a RAID, which mode is better, thanks.
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YveauConnect With a Mentor Commented:
RAID 10 is - in my experience - the best you can get for an OLTP database system.
But that is expensive as you have pretty much overhead ... RAID 5 is good ... RAID 1 is not very good and RAID 0 is not so good ... to put it in a nutshell ...

Hope this helps ...
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dportasCommented:
turbot_yu: You can afford RAID but you can't afford a book that will educate you on the subject which you are allegedly trying to learn...? Ignorance is far more expensive than knowledge so I would recommend two other books on design:

Information Modeling and Relational Databases by Terry Halpin
Practical Issues in Database Management by Fabian Pascal

Avoid RAID5 for databases. But seriously, you need to get more assistance than is possible in these forums.
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YveauCommented:
@dportas: >> "Avoid RAID5 ..."
... ? Hey, that is a surprising statement. Based on experience ? Can you clear this one up for me please ?
I'm curious ! I use it for all my databases ... (In a SAN configuration) No bad experiences myself ...

Thanks, Yveau
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dportasCommented:
RAID5 is usually advocated by storage vendors or just taken for granted by storage purchasers, without thought for the type of system using it.

The biggest cost of RAID5 is the 4 x write penalty, particularly for database work which is read-write intensive. Also, RAID5 actually offers very little protection for databases. Databases work best when spanned over many spindles. More spindles means more failures. With RAID5 you are much more likely to have failures that result in data loss, which can mean the whole database has to be restored. Add to that the enormous overhead of even a single disk failure with RAID5. RAID5 is an incredibly bad deal.

You can find supporting data in some detail at Mogens Nørgaard's excellent site:
www.baarf.com
which was established specially to make the case against RAID5 for databases.

Also, there are slides by Dr Jim Gray (now very sadly missed, alas) at:
http://loci.cs.utk.edu/dsi/netstore99/docs/presentations/keynote/sld031.htm

(Last year, Mogens and myself both attended a memorable lunch with Dr Jim Gray at which Jim enthusiastically endorsed the idea of abolishing RAID5)
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