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simple problem i think...

Posted on 2007-12-07
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
I have written the following script which should find all the occurences of a particular user in the xx file and print them to an other file (user). This all work and my output looks like this:

1  OLDPWD=/home/hussain.ahmed
2  USER=hussain.ahmed
3  MAIL=/var/spool/mail/hussain.ahmed
 Something very annoying but I want each line number to have a bracket after it. ie

1)........
2)..............
etc.

Any ideas??
#!/bin/bash
file=/home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/xx
grep $USER $file | nl >/home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/user

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Question by:Mrdogkick
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7 Comments
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:omarfarid
ID: 20426775
Try

#!/bin/bash
file=/home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/xx
grep $USER $file | nl >/home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/user | sed s/\ /\)\ /
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Author Comment

by:Mrdogkick
ID: 20426828
isn't there a way I could say 'cut into the first space of each line and add a ")"'?
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:omarfarid
ID: 20426864
Well, I am not sure if there is simple command that can give you this.

Did you try yhe solution?

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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 20426880
grep $USER $file | sed = | paste -s -d ')\n' - -


0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:omarfarid
ID: 20426975


Sorry I put sed in the wrong place. Please try

#!/bin/bash
file=/home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/xx
grep $USER $file | nl   | sed s/\ /\)\ /  > /home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/user
0
 

Author Comment

by:Mrdogkick
ID: 20426997
I am actually trying to do this without the use of sed or AWK? any ideas?
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Accepted Solution

by:
omarfarid earned 125 total points
ID: 20427081
Just use the -s option with nl. Please see:


#!/bin/bash
file=/home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/xx
grep $USER $file | nl -s") " > /home/hussain.ahmed/coursework/chapter7/user
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