host can't browse to guest in bridged mode in vmware server

Why can't the host see the guest in bridge mode, I have two servers windows 2003 64 one host one guest and I can not browse from one to another.Running vmware server.
lkuhnerAsked:
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Michael WorshamStaff Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
What IP addresses are you using on the guest OS as well as the host OS?
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lkuhnerAuthor Commented:
100.100.100.4 and 100.100.100.5 One is a dc and one is exchange 2007 so I need both ips to be reached form everywhere on the network.
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Michael WorshamStaff Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
As per VMware Server manual concerning VM's & bridged networks:

"Bridged networking is set up automatically if you select Use bridged networking in the
New Virtual Machine Wizard or if you select the Typical setup path. This selection is
available on a Linux host only if you enable the bridged networking option when you
install VMware Server.

Bridged networking is often the easiest way to give your virtual machine access to the
network when your host computer is on an Ethernet network. On a Windows host, you
can use bridged networking to connect to either a wired or a wireless network. On a
Linux host, you can use bridged networking to connect to a wired network.

If you use bridged networking, your virtual machine needs to have its own identity on
the network. For example, on a TCP/IP network, the virtual machine needs its own IP
address. Your network administrator can tell you whether IP addresses are available
for your virtual machine and what networking settings you should use in the guest
operating system. Generally, your guest operating system can acquire an IP address
and other network details automatically from a DHCP server. You might need to set the
IP address and other details manually in the guest operating system.

Using bridged networking enables the virtual machine to be a full participant in the
network. It has access to other machines on the network and can be contacted by other
machines on the network as if it were a physical computer on the network.

If the host computer is set up to boot multiple operating systems and you run one or
more of them in virtual machines, you need to configure each operating system with a
unique network address. People who boot multiple operating systems often assign all
systems the same address, since they assume only one operating system will run at a
time. If you use one or more of the operating systems in a virtual machine, this
assumption is no longer true."

PDF: http://www.vmware.com/pdf/server_vm_manual.pdf
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franked_itCommented:
Dumb question, but did you check the Windows Firewall on each Windows installation?  

Also to keep in mind...Bridged mode in VMware really is layer 2.  So if you have two network cards in your host computer, you'll have to make sure that the bridge goes to a network and card where the host and guest can see each other.  The default bridged connection bridges to the same network and adapter as the primary IP on the host, so unless you created your own VMware bridge device, this should be OK.

Can both Windows installations ping the gateway? (If there is one...)

Are they both part of the same AD domain?
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Michael WorshamStaff Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
You might want to see these threads as well:

Windows 2003 64-bit and VMWare server 1.0.4
http://communities.vmware.com/thread/122914?tstart=0

VMware 64bit?
http://communities.vmware.com/thread/112747?tstart=0
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lkuhnerAuthor Commented:
Yeah firewall is off on both. It does have two network cards. They can ping each and are in the same ad. I am getting rpc error 1722 when they try to browse each other.
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Michael WorshamStaff Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
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Michael WorshamStaff Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
Do you have NetBIOS enabled?

"Error 1722" error message when a program uses the NetUserGetLocalGroups function in Windows Server 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/829359/
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lkuhnerAuthor Commented:
Netbios is enable. Can vmware in bridged mode allow traffic back and forth between host and guest. The few I have read are talking about nat but that won't do me any good.
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Michael WorshamStaff Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
When you created the guest OS, did you turn off the private permissions checkbox?
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lkuhnerAuthor Commented:
Yes
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Michael WorshamStaff Infrastructure ArchitectCommented:
Did you read my above posts about VMware 1.0.4 and Win 2k3 x64? I was brushing up on the release notes and Win 2k3 x64 is supported for the host OS, but not the guest. No timeframe on when it will be available.
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franked_itCommented:
To answer you question: "Can vmware in bridged mode allow traffic back and forth between host and guest"  Yes, the generally can.  Vmware fully supports this.  

Are both network cards on the same IP subnet?  If so, I wonder if that's a routing and VMware problem.  VMware will only bind to bridge VM nic to one of your physical NICs.  If your Host OS routes the packet out the other NIC, the Host OS may not put the packet out on the wire since it's really destined for its own NIC, but it's on the wrong NIC since VMware didn't bridge on that NIC.  I'm not sure this would be a problem if the NICs are teamed, that should be fine.  In any case, you may want to try and disable one of your host NICs, and have VMware re-create the bridged adapter in the VMware network configuration utility.

Also, do you have any VLAN trunking on either of your NICs?
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lkuhnerAuthor Commented:
No vlan trunking.Both are on the same subnet. I can ping it use nslookup to use dns but can't browser and I am getting rpc errors.
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lkuhnerAuthor Commented:
When you browse it says name not available.
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franked_itCommented:
Are both the "workstation" and "server" services running on both?

Any errors in the Event Log System or Security on either host?

Did you by any chance copy or P2V either machine?  If so, you may want to try newsid by sysinternals.
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lkuhnerAuthor Commented:
I found this. It fixed the issue with exchange and rcp between hosts.
I finally found where the issue were while doing a broader search in this forum and reading a lot of threads before arriving to one that seemed like the issue at hand. The culprit was TOE (TCP OffLoad Engine). It was enabled in the server adapters and was producing this HOST-GUEST communication issues. Issuing a "netsh int ip set chimney disabled" disabled TOE and the communication between them was restored.

The issue appeared after we disabled the Broadcom SLB teaming because of a weirder issue with TCP (servers where having wrong ARP entries and so lost communication with other servers). Quite long to tell, but the result is that we disabled all teamings in all servers and that seemed to enable TOE. The funny thing is that we had a server with teaming and this problem so I'm lost by now on why this wasn't an issue before.

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franked_itCommented:
Ah ha.  Glad to hear you got it.  Bummer that disabling one feature on the Broadcoms enabled another feature...
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PberSolutions ArchitectCommented:
This question has been classified as abandoned and is being closed as part of the Cleanup Program.  See my comment at the end of the question for more details.
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